Jimi Hendrix drops out as opening act for The Monkees

Jimi Hendrix drops out as opening act for The Monkees


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On July 17, 1967, one of the oddest musical pairings in history comes to an end when Jimi Hendrix dropped out as the opening act for teenybopper sensations The Monkees.

The booking of psychedelic rock god Jimi Hendrix with the made-for-television Monkees was the brainchild of Hendrix’s manager, Mike Jeffery, who was seeking greater public exposure for a young client who was a budding star in the UK, but a near-unknown in his native United States. It was in the UK, in fact, that Monkee Mike Nesmith first heard a tape of Hendrix playing while at a dinner party with John Lennon, Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton. Nesmith and his fellow Monkees Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz became instant Jimi Hendrix fans, and after witnessing his legendary performance at the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967, they encouraged their own manager to invite the little-known but highly respected Jimi Hendrix Experience to join their upcoming U.S. tour.

Hendrix himself appears to have had no direct input on the decision, though he’d made his opinion of the Monkees clear several months earlier in an interview with Melody Maker magazine: “Oh God, I hate them! Dishwater….You can’t knock anybody for making it, but people like the Monkees?” Nevertheless, Hendrix joined the tour in progress in Jacksonville, Florida, on July 8. Predictably, the reception given to the now-legendary rock icon by the young fans of the bubblegum Monkees was less than worshipful. As Mickey Dolenz later recalled, “Jimi would amble out onto the stage, fire up the amps and break out into ‘Purple Haze,’ and the kids in the audience would instantly drown him out with ‘We want Daaavy!’ God, was it embarrassing.”

Jimi Hendrix managed to get through a total of only seven dates with the Monkees, culminating in his final show on July 17, 1967, which may or may not have ended with Hendrix saluting the crowd with his middle finger. There was no truth to the widely circulated rumor that he’d been kicked off of the tour after protests by the Daughters of the American Revolution that his show was “too erotic.”


Abagond

In the summer of 1967 the Jimi Hendrix Experience, on their first cross-country concert tour of America, opened for the Monkees. They played only eight of the 29 dates:

  • July 8th 1967: Jacksonville, Florida
  • July 9th, 10th 1967: Miami, Florida
  • July 11th, 12th 1967: Charlotte, North Carolina
  • July 14th, 15th, 16th 1967: Forest Hills, Queens, New York

The Monkees were a knock-off of the early Beatles made for American television. Despite their questionable talent millions of 11- to 15-year-old girls in America loved them, in particular Davy Jones, frontman and heart-throb. They were the best-selling band in America at the time.

Jimi Hendrix hated them:

Oh God, I hate them! Dishwater. I really hate somebody like that make it so big. You can’t knock anybody for making it, but people like the Monkees?

His manager had a different opinion: opening for the Monkees would put Hendrix in front of hundreds of thousands of American record-buyers. Despite three hit songs in Britain he was little known in America. He needed something to follow up his success in June at the Monterey Pop Festival in California.

The Monkees loved the idea. They were huge fans: “some of the best music I’ve ever heard in my life,” said Mike Nesmith. Mickey Dolenz said:

The Monkees was very theatrical in my eyes and so was the Jimi Hendrix Experience. It would make the perfect union.

It did not go well:

Jimi would amble out onto the stage, fire up the amps, and break into “Purple Haze”, and the kids in the audience would instantly drown him out with “We want Daavy!” God, was it embarrassing.

When Hendrix tried to get 20,000 girls to sing along with “Foxy Lady” they would say “Davy!” instead of “Foxy”.

Rock music critic Lillian Roxon saw the show in Forest Hills, Queens. She said Hendrix’s love for his guitar was:

so passionate, so concentrated and so intense that anyone with halfway decent manners had to look away. And that was the way the act began, not ended. By the time it was over he had lapped and nuzzled his guitar with his lips and tongue, caressed it with his inner thighs, jabbed at it with a series of powerful pelvic thrusts.

As a joke she said the Daughters of the American Revolution got him fired for being “too erotic”. In fact on the eighth night Hendrix gave the audience the finger and stormed off stage. And that was it.

One woman who saw the show in Charlotte when she was 11 remembers it this way:

I have no recollections of anyone screaming for the Monkees to come on stage. All I remember is everyone screaming, standing on chairs, jumping up and down, waving their arms in the air, and being entranced by Jimi Hendrix on that stage. The music was like nothing I had ever heard and the crowd was in a fever when he was on stage. The last thing I remember about the evening was him setting his guitar on fire.

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Interesting story. In hindsight, it does seem humorous as we know how that kind of turned out in the end.

There are so many levels of irony involved in that set of facts.

Jimi wasn’t the only victim. Having been a kid during that era, I can attest that there were many kids who preferred the Monkees over the Beatles.

Did you know that Jimi also played for a time with the Isley Brothers? I believe he even crashed at the home of one of the Isleys. They thought his guitar playing was too wild.

Of course the easy commercial success of bubble gum pop over real art is by now so time tested and market proven that it’s not even remarkable. Justin Bieber, Brittney Spears, Nikki Minaj, everybody associated with Disney, the list could strech on for pages. With the ubiquity of auto-tune, guide tracks, etc., the only requirement to throw a pop star up the charts is a photogenic face.

The first hits by the Monkees weren’t played by the four guys in the show at all. They were written by professional songwriters and recorded by session musicians, mostly by The Wrecking Crew, which was sort of like the LA analog of The Funk Brothers, except the Wrecking Crew weren’t beholden to just one studio.

Later, as the band’s fame grew, the band, which contained at least two guys who had been actual working musicians before the show, began to insist on greater involvement in the process of writing their songs and performing them on stage.

The band’s manager, Don Kirshner, chafed at the band for being uppity and diluting his vision. He made sure this would not occur with his next fictional bubble gum pop act by building the band from cartoon characters: The Archies.

Nice post, Abagond. Hendrix played with a lot of soul/R&B giants (and lesser knowns).

The riff that everyone knows from Aretha Franklin’s “Save Me” was originally taken from Ray Sharpe’s “Help me Get the Feeling” on which Hendrix played though I’m not 100% certain that he came up with that riff. Cornell Dupree is listed as one of the songwriters. Dupree was a huge influence on Jimi.

The drummer for the monkees , Jimmy Dolenz , was actualy a child actor who was in a series called ” Circus Boy” , or something…

Ironicly , when Hendrix would hit it big with his English group and a wave of English rockers would hit the US shores, not only were some incredible Rhythm and Blues and Soul groups , like Fontella Bass, Smokey Robinson, James Brown , The Impresions , Martha and the Vandellas , Curtis Mayfeild , James Brown ( pretty much regulated to the Chitlin circuit until Rocky 2 came out) , and many others ,but, as well , some of the unbeleivible jazz groups like Miles Davis and John Coltrane who were at their peak of making some of the most incredible music on the century, were sluffed aside for the media driven hype for rock and roll…

Yeah, I think Hendrix stood out from many of the rockers , especialy because of his Soul background, which was very apherant in the way he held and played his guitar ( when he had the group with Buddy MIles, it was almost funky) , but, still, a whole lot of incredible talent was denied any real exposure to the public at that time….besides some ocasional American Bandstand and Hollywood a Go go aperances.

some of the unbelievable jazz groups like Miles Davis and John Coltrane who were at their peak of making some of the most incredible music on the century, were sluffed aside for the media driven hype for rock and roll…

“Sluffed off” Yes B.R., this hit some harder than others. A few months ago I watched part of a documentary on Mingus. The documentary made a link between an incredible downfall in Mingus’ career and the record company shift away from many types of music definitely a shift away from Jazz, to an emphatic promotion of Rock music.
It was affecting and unpleasant to see what happened to him. I believe ‘Trane was established enough that he could still keep doing what he wished to do.

Miles would add to what you’ve said. (He was not going to be sluffed off so easy.) In his autobiography he talks about what he saw happening with Rock music taking the lead in the public’s taste for music. As you know, he rethought his approach to his record company, to his style, to how he was going to be able sell units, to whom he should collaborate with, etc and then he brought about Jazz Fusion. A born survivor, that man was, relentless and intelligent essential qualities for life on planet Earth. (oh and love, nearly forgot that quality, oops)

As brilliant as Mile’s response was to Rock’s dominance I think he went through some suffering and self doubt too. I read his autobiography too long ago to know how accurate I’m being. (So correct me where I’m possibly off.) But I’m remembering this: Miles dated, I believe, an ex-girlfriend of Jimi’s. Apparently she was exceedingly beautiful which was matched by an intense vanity and shallowness. Miles, typically was a take no shit kind of man. But he put up with this woman for ages. As I recall, what he says in his book was that his sales were suffering and he knew there was some kind of ceiling for him now with Rock music being so dominant. He was depressed for quite some time about it all and stayed in this abusive relationship. He eventually got out of the depression and got rid of the chick.

Jazz really suffered a massive exogenous shock when Rock and Roll came around.

Do you know if Jimi Hendrix played with anyone in the funk band ‘George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic’?

since most of those guys started playing back in the 60’s, I wondered if they knew each other. Funk music sounded like it was influenced by Jimi Hendrixs’ style of rock music.

I heard that the Monkees were a “mock” group trying to be like the Beatles, but as silly as their television show was, it was entertaining.

Looking back, it’s easy to make a correlation between this and how the music industry operates when it comes to “talent” and I use that term very loosely.

Miles’ wife at the time was Betty Davis (nee Mabry) and he gives her a lot of credit for turning him on to a lot of the new sounds and clothing styles that were going on at that time. He says that musically she was ahead of her time and if she had been active in the eighties, she would have been like Madonna or Prince. He was quite gracious in his praise.

Unfortunately, according to his autobiography she was also unfaithful to him and had an affair with Hendrix, and this, along with the difference in their ages led to a divorce. FWIW, I don’t believe that Betty Davis ever admitted to any affair. I can’t call it and I guess ultimately it doesn’t matter.

Well, SW6 , and, Shady , you make great points about Miles confronting and trying to find his niche in the rock world hype . And, Im not sure the exact story with his wife. I heard that John Mccglaugclin took him to a Hendrix concert , and, that peaked is interest , and, I kept hearing a rumor that they were supposed to have gotten together , but, it never went off….

Linda, I honestly cant anwser that question right now, but, an incredible drummer who plays jazz and funk and sometimes now plays for Santana (when his wife Cindy Blackman isnt), Dennis Chambers , was a Parlament Funkadelic drummer

The main thing about that period of the Monkees and Miles and Hendrix and the Rock wave was, that at that early 60″s period, Miles was into an incredible stage of developement with his jazz group, in a very killer jazz swing style , and a very high leval of music…and, rock and avant guarde jazz took attention off the greatness of that style, but, it will be studied for decades to come..you can beleive it

SW6, good point about Mingus ( by the way, you brought in a referaance to a Cannonball solo with Nav Singh copying it over Cannonbal , on guitar…..what is your relation with Nav Singh ?)

( I meant Miles seeing Hendrix piqued his interist)

Miles was influenced by Hendrix , and, wanted guitar players like Mccglauclin , Sonny Sharrok , Pete Cosey, Reggie Lucas , and Mike Stern to aproximate that energy ( Scofeild got into more of a bluesey concept).

I saw those earliar Miles bands trying to go electric, with Correa, Jarret, Steve Grossman , etc, and, with Dejonnette going free a lot, they never tried to just aproximate a rock band, but, some reocords like Jack Johnson, Live Evil tried to get with pretty rocky with Sonny and Mccglauclin….but Jack on Live Evil is so out there, he predates drum and bass on a Miles solo on Fonky Tonk by decades…

And On the Corner wasnt a rock concept at all and the band with Cosey was really dark and layered and not really rock also

I played with Sonny Sharrock, Pete Cosey ( just passed and played on the electric Mud records) , Stern and Socfeild and Steve Grossman, all formadable players

But Miles did want some of those guitarists to aproximate Hendrix

Hendrix was great, dont get me wrong, but, rock is sort of 101 dick jane and sally of Afro diasporic concepts

Sorry folks, I didnt see my posts come up so i did a bunch of posts that sounded the same because I though they weren coming up.

So , sorry for some duplicat posts if they come up

Part of this story reminds me of the late 70s, when Prince was just starting out, and he opened for the Rolling Stones. He got booed off the stage because the Stones fans weren’t having any of it…or maybe they just couldn’t appreciate/didn’t understand what Prince was about. In any case, I wonder how many or if any of those people would later come to appreciate Prince and his music in the same way that Hendrix is revered now?

^Yuck! Prince opening for The Rolling Stones, things like that make no sense whatsoever. But, Prince opening for James Brown, I can imagine things like that…

HA! Relation with Nav Singh? B.R. good chap, you flatter me. I have no connection to the man at all. I just found his vid because I was searching for versions of Oleo on YouTube one day. I linked it in the Miles Davis thread ’cause I thought you (and others) would be into it.

Relative to their other white rock brethren, the Rolling Stones tended to give public credit and opening act opportunities to black musicians back in the day. One could be cynical and suggest that it was just to try to gain “authenticity” but so it goes. They have had Ike /Tina Turner, Buddy Guy/Junior Wells, Stevie Wonder, Peter Tosh, and BB King among other black opening acts.

Although in my opinion most of the Rolling Stones’ music lacks true swing and bounce, again, compared to other white rock bands, they do swing and so someone like Prince who plays real rock and roll and not just “rock” would theoretically have been a good opening act.

Shady, Im sorry I forgot to mention your name about bringing up Miles wife and Im going to read your link now…

I tell you what gets me about the whole rock hype by the media, and that is exactly what it was, there are people going to their graves thinking the Beatles ,Stones and Dylan are gods. When the truth is, they are going to be diminished and the people who were really breaking ground in music are going to be remembered and studied, like Coltrane, and Miles. And its going to be noted that James Brown changed the beat and affected all the music that came in on the hip hop tip that dominated the 90’s

Smokey Robinson is my poet for that era

Its just like back in the roaring 20’s, Rudy Valee was the big star of the day , but, we dont really go back and study him, we study Louis Armstribg, Duke Ellington etc

Hendrix was special and ther are some great rock people, but, the incredible talents smothered by all the record company hype is just sad. Ill take Fontlla Bass and Martha and the Vandellas over Janis Jopln anyday ( I admit Im very opinionate about this)

Nice article , Shady, Filles de Killamanjaro is one of my favorites

Interesting.
Today it would probably translate to “Kendrick Lamar opening for Justin Bieber”.

Thanks B.R. I love just about all music but get very upset with how some forms of music (or musicians) get ignored. But that’s life…

Also, I would be interested in hearing any Pete Cosey stories you have, B.R. he was another fellow who didn’t quite get the attention he deserved. Part of it may have been the obvious and part of it was I don’t think he often (ever. ) recorded as a leader.

Shady….Ha, stories about Pete Cosey…for sure Ive got a couple

I was lucky enough to be running around with a great Chicago trumpet player, Billy Brimfeild, who I played with in a band. He got me into the George Hunter Moonlighters Big Band, George being an x baritone player with Dizzy Guilespi , had this band that used some of the absolute top black Chicago musicians…Pete was one of them..

My first encounter of Pete was at a jam session at the High Chaperal on the South Side and we were doing a really fast up tempo version of Milestones, and I was playing congas and Pete leaned over and said ” Hey man, would you lay out…”…I was young and he just crushed my little world…but I went home and cried and practiced even harder , so, he made me better

Another story, we were playing with the George Hunter band at big enourmous prom in downtown Chicago, and , an enormous gang fight broke out, and I mean enormous, like a scene from those old western bar fight brawls in the movies…and the fights were going all on the bandstand and back into the kitchen, and, all the musicians were scattering, and Pete got up on the mic, and in the middle of absolute chaos, was saying ” Brothers, brothers, we dont need all this violance and destuction…etc”

He did a lot of Chess record dates , and , was on the Electric Mud records, and was part of the famous AACM in Chicago , who explored deep varitetis of black music and avant guarde jazz

Thanks. B.R.
I had heard the story about Pete Cosey playing with Howling Wolf, who wasn’t that impressed with the new sound and at one point stood up to tell Cosey “Why don’t you take your amps and pedals and that wah-wah s*** and throw them all in the lake on your way to get a haircut?”

I’ve got most of Cosey’s work with Phillip Cochran I think.
I think I’ll pull out Agharta when I get home.

“Now, however, as Bahrain’s “Sheikh of Sheikhs” observes, and thanks to modern technology, the pyramids can be destroyed. The only question left is whether Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood president is “pious” enough—if he is willing to complete the Islamization process that started under the hands of Egypt’s first Islamic conqueror.”

As we can see, Muslims destroy Black African heritage. All Black Africans should rethink Islam. Black Africans should demand reparations from Arabs. The oil sheiks fear Israeli nukes, so they will comply.

This will not go well with Afrocentrists. Actually, regardless whether Muslims will become enraged or not, nuking Mecca becomes a moral and religious duty. Mecca is the idol of the Muslim. The very fact that Mecca has to be protected or avenged, proves that it is an idol. After all, that is the logic Muslims use when they attack someone else’s religious stuff. The destruction of Mecca proves that the Muslim will burn eternally in hell.

BR: Interesting comments and stories. Since we have had recorded entertainment media, we have seen markets saturated by a large volume of cheap pop pabulum, with a few bright points of real art. This relates to the nature of “art” once it becomes a commodity. Over time, as you note, the chaff falls away and we return to study the real wheat.

The advent of rock music as a hugely popular genre is almost directly related to the advent of high quality LP recording and widespread ownership of powerful stereo systems on which to play them. The genre could not have existed at that scale without these technological developments. And, because of these developments, there was a quantum increase in the volume of material released by the industry, most of which was pretty much completely worthless from the perspective of Art (with a capital “A”).

But there were a few bright point, Hendrix being one of them. Much in the way James Brown almost singlehandedly created funk, Hendrix literally re-defined the way the guitar as an instrument was played. I’m not talking about any unique modes or scales or chord substitutions. I mean the physical act of playing the instrument, how the hands impact it, how the power of the sound from the amplifier is used, etc. He added layers and dimensions to this lexicon that nobody before him had even imagined.

Segovia often spoke of the “innate excellence of the spirit” and how this can be revealed by technique. Of course Segovia was speaking in the context of classical guitar, but I’ve often applied that concept to Jimi in connection with the electric guitar.

Blanc2 , I hear you , as I said, Im very opinionated , and, I do think Hendrix is special.

About what people will look back on in 100 years, from now, that people wil study of the 60’s, no one can really say for sure, except yes, the mediocre will be diminished , that doesnt mean no one will talk about the Beatles, but, they wont have the hype of gods they have been awarded by the media now, and, that will make a huge differance. All of us will have to go to our grave for many years and then the truth will set in about what has real value at that time…

And here is a hint and something to think about, there are literaly , right now at this moment, hundreds into the thousands of educational institutions devoted to the study of jazz and what Miles Davis, Monk, John Coltrane , Loius Armstrong, Duke Ellington , Wayne Shorter etc contributed. Including music of that time of the Beatles, Stones, Dylan etc

Why? Because it really has depth.There are lots of things to discover ad learn, a huge amount of direction.There was tons of horrible commercial music in the jazz era, as mediocre as rock. But these incredible musicians are being studied en masse , right now in our higher institutions of learning in music.

I know they teach some Beatles somewhere , they teach rock somewhere , maybe GIT has a program, but, there just isnt the depth to really dig into it.

Rock is really made for young kids in a garage, mostly white, who just got expensive instruments from their parents. Rockers have to get outside thier idiom to really expand

I do plead guilty of being opinionated about this,

“Including music of that time of the Beatles, Stones, Dylan etc”, meaning they are studying music of Miles Davis and Wayne Shorter and Coltrane that they were writing and playing at the same time as the Beatles were gettng their fame for I want to hold your Hand…

Think about it this way , Blanc2, the rockers got to have it all in their lifetime, the money, the fame, the legends in thier own minds, and legends in their lifetimes, some of them god status

Who is getting studied now is the black jazz musicians , who worked in the most deplorable of conditions, got jim crow stuck in their face in the south at that time, got messed over and turned down by the major lables except for the very few , had to deal with white jazers and rockers getting the successes

and now we are finding ot they were the Devine ones of that time

I don’t disagree with anything you say. As you know, rock’s power was as a social force, not an artistic genre. It was the music of proletariat youth. Leo Fender invented an inexpensive instrument, one an average kid could afford, and James Marshall invented a powerful amplifier from used WWII technology. Together, these two items enabled small groups of young people, with just a little bit of basic musical knowledge (the term 𔄛 chord rock” doesn’t come from a vacuum), to play very loud and thus be heard by large audiences.

Punk rock recaptured that energy for a minute in the late 1970’s, before it was co-opted by the music industry.

At the same time, rock music has offered at least a few important facets to the lexicon of musical knowledge. Jimi Hendrix was one of the big contributors in that regard because of the dimenions he added to the instrument. He literally invented ways of playing the guitar that nobody had used before.

I’ll close with a fantastic metaphor for the tension you describe. There was a guy named Lenny Breau. You may or may not be familiar with Lenny. He was a guitarist’s guitaris, a jazz monster who did all manner of truly amazing stuff on the guitar. Lenny grew up in a musical family and was on stage from a young age. When Lenny was a teen, his family landed in Winnipeg (Canada). There, Lenny was befriended by a local teen who wanted to learn how to play guitar. Lenny hung out with this kid and taught him some basic chords and scales.

That kid was and is Randy Bachman, of the Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive. Randy got rich and famous banging out three-chord rock, whilst Lenny Breau created works of sublime richness and beauty in obscurity, dying at a young age in a Hollywood hotel swimming pool, maybe strangled by his (probably fed up) wife, probably with tons of substances in his system.

Since then, Randy has gathered some of Lenny’s recorded but unreleased material, clean it up, release it, and disburse the profits to Lenny’s widow and family. There’s even a web site for this. Check it out.

Blanc2 , thanks for that link on Lenny Breau. I have heard of him but I am not an expert on all his work

To be sure there are people who play good jazz who enter rock. And rockes who come to it later

I earnastly invite you , Blanc2 to investigate some of the music of Wayne Shorter, songs like , JuJu, Black Nile, Fe Fi Fo Fum, Witchhunt, Footprints, and go buy Miles Smiles ( maybe you have it already). Go to the heart of where one of our great geniuses of American music was at his best ( the Miles period), investigate the tempos they played at and the harmonies they wrote with and the structures and melodies and pollyrhythms. I have never been the same……

Been there, loved it, still doing it. Don’t you recall our discussions in these ideas in the Miles post a few months ago? Meanwhile, my son is hip to Cobham, Narada Michael Walden, etc.

Lenny Breau is well worth investigating. As mentioned, he was a guitarist’s guitarist. His technique, especially his use of false harmonics and walking bass simultaneously with melody, was genius.

Branc2 , I absolutly do remember our discusion, but, I never remember finding out the depth you are taking your jazz. You never mentioned if you were learning those songs by Wayne, and, I discover that jazz cats either love Wayne and know those tunes or they never heard of them ( but a lot of people know Footprints, but, Wayne is a lot more). I never found out if you really understand the form of Gingerbread boy , in other words how deep are you really taking your jazz? And that is my point, there are jazz players and then there are the Devine ones….Can you hold down an up tempo blues ? If you can, Id love to play with you….if you cant, you may not know entirly what Im talking about ( Blanc2 does play guitar, so, Im not challenging him just finding out what he knows)

I did listen to Lenny Breau a long time ago, and , I will check him out again, but , I did hear him and love his lyrical line and harmony, but, wasnt thrilled with the depth of his swing like this guy (please jump straight to 1:50) and see how this guy absolutly dominates the harmony , melody, and swing, he swings harder than Lenny, that is why I didnt just become a Lenny Breau afficianodo . Absolutly nothing against someone who is , but, Ive been there…also , and, there is a lot of room for personal taste…right? and then there are the innovators and their contribution, and jazz is a black American innovation..the deep treasure is in those black American roots. If you really are ino jazz,that has to be the roots of any discusion about jazz….why Lenny Breau ? just curious, because , I look to Wes (Montgomery) as the king of all those guys who sound like that…

By the way, I like your description of Hendrix and what he meant to the rock sound…My idea of the consumat musician who knows Hendrix, James Brown, Miles , Coltrane and the deepest of funk and soul singing….Marcus Miller….that is a cosumate musician

ha , I made a referance to a youtube in a post in moderation, and, I forgot to link it:

please go directly to 1:50 to see an example of what I love in a jazz guitarist…nothing against Lenny Breau, I just love this guy more

…and, I want to apologise for starting my jazz rap over here on a Hendrix, thread, it came up because Miles was influenced by Hendrix

If this is way out of place , Im happy to pick it up over on the Miles thread…

I admit, I dont like rock, the sound of the loud screeching guitars grates on my soul compared to a Wayne Shorter chord, the drummers are heavy handed and stiff compared to the Afro diasporic grooves I have been hearing down here in Brazil and compared to jazz, or clave ( god I saw a killer clave band in Miami, just killer, much hipper than rock), and just compare how a rock guy holds his guitar or bass to a jazz or samba master , like a stiff peice of wood

sorry, that is my 2 cents, and, I admit , Im boring

Caveatt, one rock guy I love, along with Hendrix..Santana…still going stong, and married to drop dead gorgeous Cindy Blackman…a jazz drummer ( who played with Lenny Kravitz)

I heard Mike Nesmith was big pimpin in those days.

His wife and mistress were pregnant with both his sons at the same time….

…Branc2, been checkng out Breau on Youtube, yes,incredible harmony, melodic line and facility….a guitar players player

but, he isnt the deepest swinger on guitar there ever was

Lenny’s thing was his amazing sense of chord substitution, and his ability to walk the bass while playing melody, which is very difficult to do on guitar. I can appreciate the stylings of G. Benson like those in the clip. I’ve heard/jammed with hundreds of guys who play like that, generally using a flatpick and a hollow body jazzbox set to the neck pickup, with the tone control turned all or part way down. It has become sort of the “official jazz guitar tone” — to the point where it’s almost a sense of artistic facism: you must play here, like ziss.

The genious of Lenny was his inhuman right hand technique, coupled with his “he must have two brains” ability to walk bass while playing melody. He could evoke voices from his guitar that most guitarists never even know exist, while playing two lines simultaneously. This is why I call him a guitarist’s guitarist. Much of Lenny’s genius is lost on people who don’t play the instrument.

As to Wayne Shorter, Art Ensembel of Chicago, Rahsan Roland Kirk, Don Pullen, one of my current faves The Bad Plus, I love all of this stuff and have spent much time listening/studying. I’m not nearly good enough as a musician to play that level of music. I came to jazz as an adult. It is something I will study my whole life and still feel as if I’ve only ever scratched the surface, but its beauty and depth and richness will be a treasure for me.

As to rock, I like the volume and the hubris and the testes that underlie its proletarian message of rebellion. It’s a different way of using and experiencing music. Certainly it has nothing of the cerebral and spiritual depth that jazz music contains, but then it doesn’t try to. It is a shame that our youth-oriented culture tends to elevate and reward shallow pop music while real jazz musicians struggle for daily bread, but that’s not the fault of rock music, it’s the fault of the star-maker machine that drives music sales.

@Blanc2
Really interesting conversation. i love Rahsaan Roland Kirk!
Speaking of independent bass and melody lines Blanc2, what’s your impression of jazz guitarists like Joe Pass or in a different context blues/folk guitarists like Etta Baker/Elizabeth Cotten/John Hurt who employed that style of playing?

@B.R.
B.R. I definitely get where you are coming from because so many people in my family feel the same way about jazz. I like just about any form of music except for today’s pop. Yes, most rock drumming is to be polite somewhat simpler than most jazz drumming. =) But what is your impression of some of the people who are considered to be among the best of rock or funk drummers? People like Bernard Purdie, Buddy Miles, Neil Peart, John Bonham, Clyde Stubblefield, Jabo Starks, Ziggy Modeliste, Al Jackson etc.

Or coming from another angle what’s your take on “fusion” drummers like Billy Cobham.

Thanks for the reply, Blanc2….just to say a little more about Hendrix…the guy had a vision, not just his music, but, his whole thing, the look, the philosophy…he coupled it with what was happening in London at the time, and, Ill even say the English rockers had more shutzpa than than the American rockers, and, Hendrix was there and he made that scene along with some others and made his way into the business from that vision…

Now look at his first band…Mitch Mitchel was influenced by jazz drummers, but, his time was all over the place, they invented drum machines because of rock drummers like him and Keith Moon, and that they discovered jazz drummers, when playing pop, like Steve Gadd and Harvey Mason , were so strong and precise that they had to have machines to duplicate it

The bass player was actualy a guitar player , who Hendrix urged to play bass….so, Hendrix was carrying the whole thing

With Buddy Miles, he sure did have some deep dish groove funk behind him.

There is no telling where Hendrix would be today if he were alive…I think Santana is great example of where he might have headed, he probably would have played with Marcus Miller, someone who can play bop also

About jazz and Breau, yes, his forte is harmonic, you may not be impressed with the Wes and Benson stylists, but, Ive played with guys like Jimmy Ponder ( you may not have heard of him but what a player), Richie Hart ( with Dr Lonnie Smith, really deep dish swing) and Mike Stern and John Scofeild, who are all individuals who I think swing harder than Lenney, and they may all dig Lenney.

But, I want to make it clear to anyone reading this, jazz is huge, there are a huge amount of stylings and leanings, Im into the heavy deep black American aproach with the emphasis on hard bop, bebop, drums loud and groove up tempo into the ground…that is the style I champion, then at the same time, hard driving Afro Brazilian and Afro Cuban, all emphasis on power rhythm and groove

I respect all styles in jazz but , its all about personal taste, isnt it ? And, Lenney, Bill Evans , great people and great harmonic contributions, dont swing as hard as the innovators, and, Im into the deepest powerful swing, that is directly related to the Afro diasporic concepts Ive talked about, so that is why I express the opinions the way I do….I have nothing against anyones elses preferances, but, I have deep reasons for loving and playng what I do and can express those reasons very clearly

By the way, make sure to tell your son Cobham is from Panama and can play incredible clave rhythms and up bebop…he shouldnt miss that aspect of him or he isnt really getting him

Shady, just saw your message

Well, for me, funk is a differant story than rock, its more groovy, suple and is that James Brown history, James Brown invented it

His band at first considererd themselves jazz players, Bernard Purdie considered himself a jazz drummer

New Orleans is a story all by itself, yes the Meters etc

Same with the best fuson drummers, they were jazz drummers, Cobham, Lennie White, Alphonce Mouzon , Tony Williams

Marcus Miller is the greatest funder of all time, I played bop with him with Walter Bishop Jr (great bop player with Charlie Parker). Players who played real up tempo bop have to learn to groove and think quick. When they aply it to other idioms, they can play those idioms really well

….meaning Marcus Miller is the greatest funk player of all time

…the thing about funk is, the bass player is one of the most dominant instruments…”on the one” is a funk term for the bass player always coming back to the one after a little riff in his groove.

Slap bass etc absolutly dominate the funk sound and give it a unique push all its own…I love the great slap players like Marcus who also know jazz, there is a differance in their funk than if the only played funk

I beleive Jimmy Hendrix would have played with some of the great slap funk bass players if he was alive today

Speaking of Hendrix this is slightly off topic but not really. Can someone explain the process of “covering” a song for a CD. I was reading this article and the local bluesman Johnnie Basset says he wanted to do a version of “The Wind Cries Mary” on his new CD but was unable to get permission from the estate.

I thought that if a song was commercially released that you did not need “permission” to cover it on your own CD but that you HAD to pay the proper mechanical royalties. There are tons of covers where the original artist/songwriter didn’t like the new version it but if they got paid they couldn’t say too much. Evidently this is no longer the case. Has the law changed? How does this work? I am not familiar with anyone being able to legally prevent someone from covering a tune.

I heard Mike Nesmith was big pimping in those days.

His wife and Nurit Wilde were both pregnant at the same times with his two sons.

Actualy, the complications of copyright issues forced me to write my own material and use freinds material as much as posible

I cant quote exact law. but, I was turned down by a famous person to do their song, and their wife didnt let us use it. He was one of my idols and still is, but, it makes you want to become independent of anyone

If its a releas that isnt going to be visilble on a Billboard chart or what not, its safe to say you can release it and not raise a red flag

If there is any indication a person could make some money from another person’s song, that person is going to be very interested, and, it seems they can not give permision, also, at least it did happen to me.

@ Linda, I have not read any information about Hendrix ever playing with Parliament/Funkadelic. Eddie Hazel was the first lead guitarist for Funkdelic and may have just simply been inspired by the Blues as was Hendrix, the sound apparently grew out of the Blues. Hazel began playing with Billy Nelson in New York or New Jersey and was later recruited into Funkadelic. Eddie Hazel played lead on Maggot Brain which was finally voted one of the greatest gutar solo songs of all time by Rolling Stone, which was long over due.


Rhino Factoids: Jimi Hendrix Bids The Monkees Adieu

47 years ago today, one of the most unlikely bills in rock history came to a formal conclusion, but given the way the opening act was treated by the audiences who’d come to see the headliner, it was clearly a mercy killing.

Picture it: 1967, New York, where Micky Dolenz is attending a Monkees press junket. After being informed that he absolutely must see a performance at a nearby club, where a guitarist plays with his teeth, Dolenz pops by the club and gets exactly what he’s been promised. Fast-forward to the Monterey Pop Festival, where – as Dolenz recalled in a 2013 interview with Guitar World – “I'm there watching all the acts: Ravi Shankar, the Who, and everything. All of a sudden, these three guys come on stage dressed in psychedelic outfits, and the guitar player started playing guitar with his teeth. I said, ‘Hey, that's the guy I saw in New York months ago, playing guitar with his teeth!’ We happened to be looking for an opening act, and I suggested Jimi because he was incredibly talented but also very theatrical.”

It was easy enough to sell his bandmates on the idea: Michael Nesmith had been introduced to Hendrix’s work when a tape of the guitarist’s music was playing during a dinner party he’d attended in London with John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and Eric Clapton, and as a guitarist himself, Tork didn’t need any swaying. If Jones had anything in particular to say about Hendrix signing on as the Monkees’ opening act, it seems to have been lost to history, but on the flip side of things, Hendrix had made his feelings clear on the Monkees in a Melody Maker interview a few months prior: "Oh God, I hate them! Dishwater. You can't knock anybody for making it, but people like the Monkees?" Nonetheless, Hendrix signed on, and it’s not hard to imagine why when you consider how many people would’ve been seeing him as the Monkees’ opening act.

Hendrix’s first gig with the Monkees was on July 8, 1967, in Jacksonville, Florida, and if you were only to go by Michael Nesmith’s reminiscences of the soundcheck, you’d think it was set to be the greatest concert of all time. “It was the first time I ever saw a Marshall amplifier stack, and they fired it up,” recalled Nesmith, in Harold Bronson’s Hey, Hey, We’re the Monkees. “He played the first couple of bars of ‘Hey Joe,’ and I was moved back physically about three feet. I had no idea how I’d gotten here. It was like gravity went away for a minute. And I thought, ‘Well, this guy’s from Mars he’s from some other planet, but whatever it is, thank heaven for this visitation.’ I thought, ‘This is some of the best music I’ve heard in my life.’ That night he opened in front of us, and he walked into the beast. There were twenty thousand pink waving arms. He would sing, ‘Foxy,’ and they would shout, ‘Davy.’ ‘Foxy.’ ‘Davy.’ Oh, man, it was a seriously twisted moment.”

The next six gigs Hendrix did with the group didn’t go significantly better. As Dolenz recalled in a piece on History.com, “Jimi would amble out onto the stage, fire up the amps and break out into 'Purple Haze,' and the kids in the audience would instantly drown him out with 'We want Daaavy!' God, was it embarrassing." No one seems able to definitively confirm if Hendrix actually concluded his final show on the tour – July 16, 1967 – by flipping the bird to the crowd, but given the treatment he received at the hands of the teenybopper-filled audience on those seven dates, it certainly wouldn’t be the most shocking revelation if it turned out to be true.

In the documentary The Monkees Story, Tork can be heard to say of the Monkees / Hendrix pairing that “it didn’t cross anybody’s mind that it wasn’t gonna fly,” which probably says more about the dichotomy between the music the Monkees were actually making and the music they wanted to be making than anything else. Nonetheless, by the time Hendrix made his decision on July 17, 1967 to drop off the tour, his departure can hardly have been a surprise to anyone.


Micky Dolenz recalls ill-fated Monkees tour with opening act Jimi Hendrix: ‘Yeah, it was kind of embarrassing’

Fifty years ago, on Sept. 18, 1970, guitar legend Jimi Hendrix died of asphyxia while intoxicated. He was only 27 years old, and his stint as a superstar lasted less than five years, but he obviously made his indelible mark — being declared by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as “arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music” and by Rolling Stone as the greatest guitarist of all time.

And one of the first mainstream rock acts to recognize Hendrix’s greatness was the Monkees. Unfortunately, the Monkees’ young fans weren’t quite as enthusiastic when that TV band’s Micky Dolenz came up with the seemingly bizarre idea to hire Hendrix as the opening act for the Monkees’ first U.S. tour in 1967.

Hendrix ended up playing only seven of that tour’s 29 dates, dropping out after having to contend nightly with thousands of nasty, impatient, jeering teenyboppers. “Yeah, it was kind of embarrassing,” Dolenz admits to Yahoo Entertainment. “Jimi would go, ‘Purple haze!’ and the kids would be like, ‘We want Davy!’ He’d go, ‘Foxy lady!’ and they’d yell, ‘We. Want. The. Monkees! We. Want. The. Monkees!’ He was coming up against that very typical opening-act dilemma for anyone touring with a big headliner, really.”

The odd pairing might have been doomed from the start, given the two artists’ very different audiences. But Dolenz had been a fan of Hendrix since the guitar god was still known as “Jimmy James” and performing in Greenwich Village nightclubs with the Blue Flames. “It was 1966 or so, and the Monkees were in New York on a press junket,” he recalls of the first time he saw Hendrix live. “Someone said, ‘You gotta come down to the Village and check this cat out.’ The actual act was, I think, the John Hammond Band or something. But when we went down there, I remember sitting in the front row and there was this young kid, and he was playing guitar with his teeth! I didn't even know his name at the time. I don't even know if he was introduced, but he was going under the name Jimmy James at that point. He was just great.”

About a year later, Dolenz saw Hendrix again, at the Monterey Pop Festival. Much had changed, and this time, Dolenz was even more impressed: “Between that time, Jimi had gone to England and run into a guy named Chas Chandler, who was going to be his manager. And basically what Chas Chandler did, my understanding is, was he heard Jimi and then he put Jimi together with [bassist] Noel Redding and [drummer] Mitch Mitchell. And so ironically, I guess you can say that the Jimi Hendrix Experience was a ‘manufactured group’!”

When Dolenz witnessed Hendrix’s iconic performance at the Monterey Pop Festival, he recalls, “All of a sudden this act comes on, not very well known yet, but very flamboyant — the clothes, the music. And I said, ‘Hey, that's the guy that plays guitar with his teeth!’ I recognized him. And so simultaneously, just by coincidence really, we were looking for an opening act for our first tour. So, I suggested the Jimi Hendrix Experience to our producers, because obviously it was incredible music, but also very theatrical. And the Monkees were a theatrical act, if you really examine it. I guess that's why it made sense to me. I just thought it would make a great mix.”

Apparently the admiration wasn’t mutual at first, as Hendrix had previously blasted the Monkees in the U.K. press, describing their music to Melody Maker as “dishwater” and saying, “Oh God, I hate them!” But once the Monkees’ “people went to his people,” says Dolenz, “Chas Chandler and everyone thought it was a good idea.” And so, on July 8 — less than a month after Hendrix had been the breakout star of Monterey Pop — the Jimi Hendrix Experience joined the Monkees for their first joint tour date in Jacksonville, Fla.

While the audience was vicious and unwelcoming, Dolenz was too wrapped up in watching Hendrix’s electric stage show to actually notice what was transpiring in the venue. “I didn’t even pay attention to what the audience reaction was, because I was just mesmerized by Jimi and his art,” he confesses. “We were just blown away by him every night — I know Nez [the Monkees’ Mike Nesmith] especially was. We would just stand in the wings in awe. I was fascinated by Jimi’s showmanship, by his persona. All I knew was, I liked it. And to this day, I don't care much what people thought.”

Hendrix apparently did care what people thought, as he decided to quit the Monkees’ tour just eight days later, after dates in Miami, North Carolina, and a three-night run at New York City’s Forest Hills Tennis Stadium. Later, a seemingly bitter Hendrix told British music paper the NME that he’d been replaced by “Mickey Mouse.” Dolenz can neither deny nor confirm the longstanding rumor that Hendrix flipped the bird at the combative crowd during that final NYC show, though he quips, “I've never seen evidence of that rumor, but if it's true, he certainly ain’t the first person to flip off an audience.”

In retrospect, Dolenz says he “wasn't totally surprised” that the Monkees/Hendrix tour didn’t work out. “It was just night and day,” he admits of their clashing musical styles. “And we all knew, because he was fairly unknown at the time, that those thousands and thousands of kids were there to see the Monkees. Jimi knew that too.” As for whether he thinks the negative reaction Hendrix received had anything to do with racism, he insists, “No, it had to do with the fact that these fans had spent so much of their money to see the headliners. And if fans like that are really, really anxious and passionate, they'll make their feelings known.”

Despite Hendrix’s poor reception, reservations about joining the tour in the first place, and that NME shade, he and the Monkees did hit it off, getting up to all sorts of rock ‘n’ roll adventures during their week on the road. “We spent a lot of time together. We went to clubs and wandered around aimlessly, and sometimes non-aimlessly,” says Dolenz fondly. “We got along great and had a great time. We partied we hung around in the hotel rooms jamming and just singing, having little aftershow parties. I remember once we went to the Electric Circus in New York, a very famous psychedelic place back then.

“He was a lovely man, though very different from his persona onstage. He was very quiet — I don't want to say naive, but just a real nice, real quiet guy. But then, of course, he would launch into this incredible persona onstage, which was just phenomenal. We partied, and he partied just as good as anybody else, but it wasn't like he always had to be the life of the party and always have the attention. That's probably the reason why we got along, because I’m the same way: I get fulfillment onstage, and when I'm offstage, I want to be left alone.”

Though Dolenz and the rest of the Monkees were saddened when Hendrix suddenly quit, he admits, “Frankly, I didn't feel that bad. I'd like to think that the tour gave him some sort of a little shot, some more people knowing his name. I'm sure that some of those Monkees fans went on to be Hendrix fans.” So, in the end, the Monkees — who’d often caught flak for being a “manufactured group” — were vindicated for championing Hendrix so early on. (They were also early supporters of Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, and Harry Nilsson, who all appeared on or wrote music for The Monkees sitcom.) But, Dolenz stresses, “We didn't run around tooting our horn to the NBC press department, saying, ‘Oh look, the Monkees like Jimi Hendrix! Aren't they cool?’ … And let me make it very clear, on the record: Jimi Hendrix would have done very well without us.”


Jacksonville Coliseum – Hendrix Opens For The Monkees

Former location –
Built in 1960 and demolished in 2003, the Jacksonville Coliseum had the distinction of being one of only six venues where Jimi Hendrix opened for the Monkees. The members of the Monkees specifically requested Hendrix as their opening act because they were fans, however their young audience really did not like the show and expressed their displeasure by booing and becoming unruly. Hendrix thought enough was enough and he left the tour after 7 performances.

The Coliseum hosted hundreds of concerts including Rush, Bob Dylan, Duran Duran, Billy Joel, Black Sabbath, Bon Jovi,Elvis Presley, The Smashing Pumpkins, David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Led Zeppelin, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Journey, AC/DC, Deep Purple, Def Leppard and Iron Maiden.

Jacksonville Coliseum
1145 East Adams St
Jacksonville FL 32202


Contents

Aspiring filmmaker Bob Rafelson developed the initial idea for The Monkees in 1962, but was unsuccessful in selling the series. He had tried selling it to Revue, the television division of Universal Pictures. [10] In May 1964, while working at Screen Gems, Rafelson teamed up with Bert Schneider, whose father, Abraham Schneider, headed the Colpix Records and Screen Gems Television units of Columbia Pictures. Rafelson and Schneider ultimately formed Raybert Productions. [11]

The Beatles' film A Hard Day's Night inspired Rafelson and Schneider to revive Rafelson's idea for The Monkees. As "The Raybert Producers", they sold the show to Screen Gems Television on April 16, 1965. Rafelson and Schneider's original idea was to cast an existing New York folk rock group, the Lovin' Spoonful, who were not widely known at the time. However, John Sebastian had already signed the band to a record contract, which would have denied Screen Gems the right to market music from the show.

In September 1964 Davy Jones was signed to a long-term contract to appear in TV programs for Screen Gems, make feature films for Columbia Pictures and to record music for the Colpix label. [12] Rafelson and Schneider already had him in mind for their project after their plans for the Lovin' Spoonful fell through. His involvement was publicly announced on July 14, 1965, when The Hollywood Reporter stated that he was expected to return to the United States in September (after a trip to England) "to prepare for [a] TV pilot for Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson". [13] Jones had previously starred as the Artful Dodger in the Broadway theatre show Oliver!, which debuted on December 17, 1962, and his performance was later seen on The Ed Sullivan Show the same night as the Beatles' first appearance on that show, February 9, 1964. He was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical in 1963. [14]

On September 8–10, 1965, Daily Variety and The Hollywood Reporter ran an ad to cast the remainder of the band/cast members for the TV show:

Madness!! Auditions. Folk & Roll Musicians-Singers for acting roles in new TV series. Running parts for 4 insane boys, age 17–21. Want spirited Ben Frank's-types. Have courage to work. Must come down for interview.

Out of 437 applicants, [15] the other three chosen for the cast of the TV show were Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz. Nesmith had been working as a musician since early 1963 and had been recording and releasing music under various names, including Michael Blessing and "Mike & John & Bill" and had studied drama in college. Of the final four, Nesmith was the only one who actually saw the ad in Daily Variety and The Hollywood Reporter. Tork, the last to be chosen, had been working the Greenwich Village scene as a musician, and had shared the stage with Pete Seeger he learned of The Monkees from Stephen Stills, whom Rafelson and Schneider had rejected as a songwriter. Dolenz was an actor (his father was veteran character actor George Dolenz) who had starred in the TV series Circus Boy as a child, using the stage name Mickey Braddock, and was produced by Screen Gems. He had also played guitar and sung in a band called the Missing Links, which released one single, "Don't Do It". By that time he was using his real name he found out about The Monkees through his agent.

During the casting process Don Kirshner, Screen Gems' head of music, was contacted to secure music for The Monkees pilot. Not getting much interest from his usual stable of Brill Building writers, Kirshner assigned Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart to the project. [16] The duo contributed four demo recordings for the pilot. [17] One of these recordings was "(Theme From) The Monkees" which helped get the series the green light. [18]

When The Monkees was picked up as a series, development of the musical side of the project accelerated. Columbia-Screen Gems and RCA Victor entered into a joint venture called Colgems Records primarily to distribute Monkees records. [19] Raybert set up a rehearsal space and rented instruments for the group to practice playing in April 1966, [20] but it quickly became apparent they would not be in shape in time for the series debut. The producers called upon Kirshner to recruit a producer for the Monkees sessions. [21]

Kirshner called on Snuff Garrett, composer of several hits by Gary Lewis & the Playboys, to produce the initial musical cuts for the show. Garrett, upon meeting the four Monkees in June 1966, decided that Jones would sing lead, a choice that was unpopular with the group. This cool reception led Kirshner to drop Garrett and buy out his contract. [1] Kirshner next allowed Nesmith to produce sessions, provided he did not play on any tracks he produced. [20] Nesmith did, however, start using the other Monkees on his sessions, particularly Tork as a guitarist. [22] Kirshner came back to the enthusiastic Boyce and Hart to be the regular producers, but he brought in one of his top East Coast associates, Jack Keller, to lend some production experience to the sessions. [20] Boyce and Hart observed quickly that when brought into the studio together, the four actors fooled around and tried to crack each other up. Because of this, they often brought in each singer individually. [23]

According to Nesmith, it was Dolenz's voice that made the Monkees' sound distinctive, and even during tension-filled times Nesmith and Tork sometimes turned over lead vocal duties to Dolenz on their own compositions, such as Tork's "For Pete's Sake", which became the closing title theme for the second season of the television show.

The Monkees' debut and second albums were meant to be a soundtrack to the first season of the TV show, to cash in on the audience. In the 2006 Rhino Deluxe Edition re-issue of their second album, More of the Monkees, Mike Nesmith stated, "The first album shows up and I look at it with horror because it makes [us] appear as if we are a rock 'n' roll band. There's no credit for the other musicians. I go completely ballistic, and I say, 'What are you people thinking?' [The powers that be say], 'Well, you know, it's the fantasy.' I say, 'It's not the fantasy. You've crossed the line here! You are now duping the public. They know when they look at the television series that we're not a rock 'n' roll band it's a show about a rock 'n' roll band. . nobody for a minute believes that we are somehow this accomplished rock 'n' roll band that got their own television show. . you putting the record out like this is just beyond the pale." Within a few months of their debut album, Music Supervisor Don Kirshner was forcibly dismissed and the Monkees took control as a real band.

The Monkees' first single, "Last Train to Clarksville" b/w "Take a Giant Step", was released in August 1966, just weeks prior to the TV broadcast debut. In conjunction with the first broadcast of the television show on September 12, 1966, on the NBC television network, NBC and Columbia had a major hit on their hands. [24] The first long-playing album, The Monkees, was released a month later it spent 13 weeks at No. 1 and stayed on the Billboard charts for 78 weeks. Twenty years later, during their reunion, it spent another 24 weeks on the Billboard charts. The album included Nesmith on lead vocals on "Papa Gene's Blues", a folk-rock and country-rock fusion that Nesmith also wrote. [25]

In assigning instruments for purposes of the television show, a dilemma arose as to which of the four would be the drummer. Both Nesmith (a skilled guitarist and bassist) and Tork (who could play several stringed and keyboard instruments) were peripherally familiar with the instrument but both declined to give the drum set a try. Jones knew how to play the drums and tested well enough initially on the instrument, but the producers felt that, behind a drum kit, the camera would exaggerate his short stature and make him virtually hidden from view. Thus, Dolenz (who only knew how to play the guitar) was assigned to become the drummer. Tork taught Dolenz his first few beats on the drums, enough for him to fake his way through filming the pilot, but he was soon taught how to play properly. [26] Thus, the lineup for the TV show most frequently featured Nesmith on guitar, Tork on bass, Dolenz on drums and Jones as a frontman, singer and percussionist, although this lineup did not correspond to the members' musical strengths. Tork was a more experienced guitar player than Nesmith, while Nesmith had trained on the bass. While Jones had a strong lead voice, and did sing lead on several Monkees recordings, Dolenz's voice is regarded, particularly by Nesmith, as distinctive and a hallmark of the Monkees' sound. [27] This theoretical lineup was actually depicted once, in the music video for the band's song "Words", which shows Jones on drums, Tork playing lead guitar, Nesmith on bass and Dolenz fronting the group. In concert appearances Tork also took much of the guitar duties, even in appearances with Nesmith, and Dolenz often plays rhythm guitar on stage.

Unlike most television shows of the time, The Monkees episodes were written with many setups, requiring frequent breaks to prepare the set and cameras for short bursts of filming. Some of the "bursts" are considered proto-music videos, inasmuch as they were produced to sell the records. The Monkees Tale author Eric Lefcowitz noted that the Monkees were—first and foremost—a video group. The four actors spent 12-hour days on the set, many of them waiting for the production crew to do their jobs. Noticing that their instruments were left on the set unplugged, the four decided to turn them on and start playing. [28]

After working on the set all day, the Monkees (usually Dolenz or Jones) would be called into the recording studio to cut vocal tracks. As the band was essential to this aspect of the recording process, there were few limits on how long they could spend in the recording studio, and the result was an extensive catalogue of unreleased recordings.

On tour Edit

Pleased with their initial efforts, Columbia (over Kirshner's objections) planned to send the Monkees out to play live concerts. The massive success of the series—and its spin-off records—created intense pressure to mount a touring version of the group. Against the initial wishes of the producers, the band went out on the road and made their debut live performance in December 1966 in Hawaii.

They had no time to rehearse a live performance except between takes on set. They worked on the TV series all day, recorded in the studio at night and slept very little. The weekends were usually filled with special appearances or filming of special sequences. These performances were sometimes used during the actual series. The episode "Too Many Girls (Fern and Davy)" opens with a live version of "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" being performed as the scene was shot. One entire episode was filmed featuring live music. The last show of the premiere season, "Monkees on Tour", was shot in a documentary style by filming a concert in Phoenix, Arizona, on January 21, 1967. [20] Bob Rafelson wrote and directed the episode.

In DVD commentary tracks included in the Season One release, Nesmith admitted that Tork was better at playing guitar than bass. In Tork's commentary he stated that Jones was a good drummer, and had the live performance lineups been based solely on playing ability, it should have been Tork on guitar, Nesmith on bass and Jones on drums, with Dolenz taking the fronting role. The four Monkees performed all the instruments and vocals for most of the live set. The most notable exceptions were during each member's solo sections where, during the December 1966 – May 1967 tour, they were backed by the Candy Store Prophets. During the summer, 1967 tour of the United States and the UK (from which the Live 1967 recordings are taken), they were backed by a band called the Sundowners. The Monkees toured Australia and Japan in 1968. The results were far better than expected. Wherever they went, the group was greeted by scenes of fan adulation reminiscent of Beatlemania. This gave the singers increased confidence in their fight for control over the musical material chosen for the series. [2]

Andrew Sandoval noted in Rhino's 2006 Deluxe Edition CD reissue of More of the Monkees that album sales were outstripping Nielsen ratings, meaning that more people were buying the music than watching the television show, which meant that the producers decided that more attention needed to be paid to the music and that more music needed to be produced for more albums. Sandoval also noted that their second album, More of the Monkees, propelled by their second single, "I'm a Believer" b/w "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone", became the biggest-selling LP of their career, spending 70 weeks on the Billboard charts, staying No. 1 for 18 weeks, [29] becoming the third-highest-selling album of the 1960s. [30] (The album also returned to the charts in 1986 for another 26 weeks.)

At the time songwriters Boyce and Hart considered the Monkees to be their project, with Tommy Boyce stating in the 2006 Rhino reissue of More of the Monkees that he considered the Monkees to be actors in the television show, while Boyce and Hart were the songwriters and producers doing the records. They wanted Micky to sing the faster songs and have Davy sing the ballads. He also stated in the liner notes that he felt that Michael's country leanings did not fit in with the Monkees' image and, although he thought that Peter was a great musician, Peter had a different process of thinking about songs that were not right for the Monkees. Music Coordinator Kirshner, though, realizing how important the music was, wanted to move the music in a newer direction than Boyce and Hart, and so he decided to move the production to New York where his A-list of writers/producers resided.

However, the Monkees had been complaining that the music publishing company would not allow them to play their own instruments on their records or to use more of their own material. These complaints intensified when Kirshner moved track recording from California to New York, leaving the band out of the musical process until they were called upon to add their vocals to the completed tracks. This campaign eventually gained the group more participation in the recording process and laid the groundwork for Kirshner's departure. Dolenz's initial reaction, mentioned in the 2006 Rhino CD reissue of More of the Monkees, was "To me, these were the soundtrack albums to the show, and it wasn't my job. My job was to be an actor and to come in and to sing the stuff when I was asked to do so. I had no problem with that . . . It wasn't until Mike and Peter started getting so upset that Davy and I started defending them . they were upset because it wasn't the way they were used to making music. The artist is the bottom line. The artist decides what songs are gonna go on and in what order and who writes 'em and who produces 'em." Nesmith, when asked about the situation, in Rolling Stone magazine, said, ". We were confused, especially me. But all of us shared the desire to play the songs we were singing. Everyone was accomplished--the notion [that] I was the only musician is one of those rumors that got started and won't stop--but it was not true . We were also kids with our own taste in music and were happier performing songs we liked--and/or wrote--than songs that were handed to us . The [TV show's] producers [in Hollywood] backed us and David went along. None of us could have fought the battles we did [with the music publishers] without the explicit support of the show's producers." [31]

Four months after their debut single was released in September 1966, on January 16, 1967, the Monkees held their first recording session as a fully functioning, self-contained band, recording an early version of Nesmith's self-composed top 40 hit single "The Girl I Knew Somewhere", along with "All of Your Toys" and "She's So Far Out, She's In". [32] Four days later, on January 20, 1967, their debut self-titled album made its belated release in the UK [20] (it was released in October '66 in the U.S.). This same month Kirshner released their second album of songs that used session musicians, More of the Monkees, without the band's knowledge. Nesmith and Tork were particularly upset when they were on tour in January 1967 and discovered this second album. The Monkees were annoyed at not having even been told of the release in advance, at having their opinions on the track selection ignored, at Kirshner's self-congratulatory liner notes and also because of the amateurish-looking cover art, which was merely a composite of pictures of the four taken for a J.C. Penney clothing advertisement. Indeed, the Monkees had not even been given a copy of the album they had to buy it from a record store. [33]

The climax of the rivalry between Kirshner and the band was an intense argument among Nesmith, Kirshner and Colgems lawyer Herb Moelis, which took place at the Beverly Hills Hotel in January 1967. Kirshner had presented the group with royalty checks and gold records. Nesmith had responded with an ultimatum, demanding a change in the way the Monkees' music was chosen and recorded. Moelis reminded Nesmith that he was under contract. The confrontation ended with Nesmith punching a hole in a wall and saying, "That could have been your face!" However, each of the members, including Nesmith, accepted the $250,000 royalty checks (equivalent to approximately $1,900,000 in today's funds). [34] [33]

Kirshner's dismissal came in early February 1967, when he violated an agreement between Colgems and the Monkees not to release material directly created by the group together with unrelated Kirshner-produced material. Kirshner violated this agreement when he released "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You", composed and written by Neil Diamond, as a single with an early version of "She Hangs Out", a song recorded in New York with Davy Jones' vocals, as the B-side. This single was only released in Canada and was withdrawn after a couple of weeks. [35]

Kirshner was reported to have been incensed by the group's unexpected rebellion, especially when he felt they had a "modicum" of talent when compared to the superstars of the day like John Lennon and Paul McCartney. [33] In the liner notes for Rhino's 2006 Deluxe Edition CD reissue of More of the Monkees, Kirshner stated, "[I controlled the group] because I had a contract. I kicked them out of the studio because I had a TV show that I had to put songs in, and to me it was a business and I had to knock off the songs." This experience led directly to Kirshner's later venture, The Archies, which was an animated series—the "stars" existed only on animation cels, with music done by studio musicians, and obviously could not seize creative control over the records issued under their name.

Screen Gems held the publishing rights to a wealth of material, with the Monkees being offered the first choice of many new songs. Due to the abundance of material numerous tracks were recorded, but these were left unreleased until Rhino Records started releasing them through the Missing Links series of albums starting in the late 1980s. A rumor persists that the Monkees were offered "Sugar, Sugar" in 1967, but declined to record it. Producer and songwriter Jeff Barry, joint writer and composer of "Sugar, Sugar" with Andy Kim, has denied this, saying that the song had not even been written at the time. [36]

Headquarters and Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Edit

The Monkees wanted to pick the songs they sang and played on, the songs they recorded and be the Monkees. With Kirshner dismissed as musical supervisor, in late February 1967 Nesmith hired former Turtles bassist Douglas Farthing Hatlelid, who was better known by his stage name Chip Douglas, to produce the next Monkees album, [33] which was to be the first Monkees album where they were the only musicians, outside of most of the bass, and the horns. Douglas was responsible for both music presentation—actually leading the band and engineering recordings—and playing bass on most of Headquarters. This album, along with their next, Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd., served as the soundtrack to the second season of the television show.

In March 1967 "The Girl I Knew Somewhere", composed by Nesmith and performed by Dolenz, Nesmith, Tork and bassist John London, was issued as the B-side to the Monkees' third single, "A Little Bit Me, a Little Bit You", and it rose to No. 39 on the charts. The A-side rose to No. 2. [37]

Issued in May 1967, Headquarters had no songs released as singles in the United States, but it was still their third No. 1 album in a row, with many of its songs played on the second season of the television show. Having a more country-folk-rock sound than the pop outings under Kirshner, Sandoval notes in the 2007 Deluxe Edition reissue from Rhino that the album rose to No. 1 on May 24, 1967, with the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper released the following week, which moved Headquarters to the #2 spot on the charts for the next 11 weeks—the same weeks which became known by the counterculture as the "Summer of Love". A selection that Dolenz wrote and composed, "Randy Scouse Git", was issued under the title "Alternate Title" (owing to the controversial nature of its original title) as a single internationally, where it rose to No. 2 on the charts in the UK and Norway, and in the top 10 in other parts of the world. [38] Tork's "For Pete's Sake" was used as the closing theme for the television show. Nesmith continued in his country-rock leanings, adding the pedal steel guitar to three of the songs, along with contributing his self-composed countrified-rock song "Sunny Girlfriend". Tork added the banjo to the Nesmith-composed rocker "You Told Me", a song whose introduction was satirical of the Beatles' "Taxman". [39] Other notable songs are the Nesmith-composed straightforward pop-rock song "You Just May Be the One" (the only track from their peak years to feature the Monkees playing the same instruments they were shown to play on the television show), used on the television series during both seasons, along with "Shades of Gray" (with piano introduction written by Tork), [40] "Forget that Girl", and "No Time", used in the television show. The Monkees wrote five of the 12 songs on the album, plus the two tracks "Band 6" and "Zilch". The Los Angeles Times, when reviewing Headquarters, stated that "The Monkees Upgrade Album Quality" and that "The Monkees are getting better. Headquarters has more interesting songs and a better quality level [than previous albums]. None of the tracks is a throwaway. The improvement trend is laudable." [41]

The high of Headquarters was short-lived, however. Recording and producing as a group was Tork's major interest and he hoped that the four would continue working together as a band on future recordings, according to the liner notes of the 2007 Rhino reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd.. "Cuddly Toy" on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. marked the last time Dolenz, who originally played guitar before the Monkees, made a solo stand as a studio drummer. [42] In commentary for the DVD release of the second season of the show, Tork said that Dolenz was "incapable of repeating a triumph." Having been a drummer for one album, Dolenz lost interest in being a drummer and, indeed, he largely gave up playing instruments on Monkees recordings to session musicians like "Fast" Eddie Hoh. (Producer Chip Douglas also had identified Dolenz's drumming as the weak point in the collective musicianship of the quartet, having to splice together multiple takes of Dolenz's "shaky" drumming for final use.) By this point, the four did not have a common vision regarding their musical interests, with Nesmith and Jones also moving in different directions—Nesmith following his country/folk instincts and Jones reaching for Broadway-style numbers. The next three albums featured a diverse mixture of musical style influences, including country-rock, folk-rock, psychedelic rock, soul/R&B, guitar rock, Broadway and English music hall sensibilities.

At the height of their fame in 1967, they also suffered from a media backlash. Nesmith states in the 2007 Rhino reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd., "Everybody in the press and in the hippie movement had got us into their target window as being illegitimate and not worthy of consideration as a musical force [or] certainly any kind of cultural force. We were under siege wherever we went there was such resentment for us. We were constantly mocked and humiliated by the press. We were really gettin' beat up pretty good. We all knew what was going on inside. Kirshner had been purged. We'd gone to try to make Headquarters and found out that it was only marginally okay and that our better move was to just go back to the original songwriting and song-making strategy of the first albums except with a clear indication of how [the music] came to be. The rabid element and the hatred that was engendered is almost impossible to describe. It lingers to this day among people my own age." Tork disagreed with Nesmith's assessment of Headquarters, stating, "I don't think the Pisces album was as groovy to listen to as Headquarters. Technically it was much better, but I think it suffers for that reason." [43]

With Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd., the Monkees' fourth album, they went back to making music for the television show, except that they had control over the music and which songs would be chosen. They used a mixture of themselves and session musicians on the album. They used this strategy of themselves playing, plus adding session musicians (including the Wrecking Crew, Louie Shelton, Glen Campbell, members of the Byrds and the Association, drummer "Fast" Eddie Hoh, Lowell George, Stephen Stills, Buddy Miles, and Neil Young) throughout their recording career, relying more on session musicians when the group became temporarily estranged after Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. and recorded some of their songs separately.

Using Chip Douglas again to produce, Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd., released in November 1967 [43] was the Monkees' fourth No. 1 album in a row, staying at No. 1 for 5 weeks, [35] and was also their last No. 1 album. It featured the hit single "Pleasant Valley Sunday" (#3 on charts) b/w "Words" (#11 on charts), the A-side had Nesmith on electric guitar/backing vocals, Tork on piano/backing vocals, Dolenz on lead vocals and possibly guitar and Jones on backing vocals [38] the B-side had Micky and Peter alternating lead vocals, Peter played organ, Mike played guitar, percussion, and provided backing vocals, and Davy provided percussion and backing vocals. [44] Other notable items about this album is that it features an early use of the Moog synthesizer on two tracks, the Nesmith-penned "Daily Nightly", along with "Star Collector". All of its songs, except for two, were featured on the Monkees' television show during the second season.

The song "What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?", recorded in June 1967 and featured on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd., is seen as a landmark in the fusion of country and rock [45] despite Nesmith's prior country-flavored rock songs for the Monkees. Nesmith stated, "One of the things that I really felt was honest was country-rock. I wanted to move the Monkees more into that because . if we get closer to country music, we'll get closer to blues, and country blues, and so forth. . It had a lot of un-country things in it: a familiar change from a I major to a VI minor—those kinds of things. So it was a little kind of a new wave country song. It didn't sound like the country songs of the time, which was Buck Owens." [45]

Their next single, "Daydream Believer" (with a piano intro written by Tork), shot to No. 1 on the charts, letting the Monkees hold the No. 1 position in the singles chart and the album chart with Pisces simultaneously. [46] "Daydream Believer" used the non-album track "Goin' Down" as its B-side, which featured Nesmith and Tork on guitar with Micky on lead vocals.

During their 1986 reunion, both Headquarters and Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. returned to the charts for 17 weeks. [35]

The Birds, The Bees & The Monkees Edit

The Monkees decided that they no longer needed Chip Douglas as a producer, and starting in November 1967, they largely produced their own sessions. [43] Although credited to the whole band, the songs were mostly solo efforts. [47] In a couple of cases, Boyce and Hart had returned from the first two albums to produce, but credit was given to the Monkees. [48] It was also during this time that Michael Nesmith recorded his first solo album, The Wichita Train Whistle Sings, a big band jazz instrumental collection of interpretations of Nesmith's compositions, arranged by the jazz musician Shorty Rogers. Praising Nesmith in The Los Angeles Times, jazz critic Leonard Feather wrote, "Verbally and musically, Mike Nesmith is one of the most articulate spokesmen for the new and literate breed of pop musicians who have spring from the loins of primitive rock. [The album] with its carriage trade of symphony, rock, country, western, and swing, and with jazz riding in the caboose, may well indicate where contemporary popular music will be situated in the early 1970s." [47]

The album is considered by some the Monkees' "White Album" (Sandoval mentions this in the liner notes of Rhino Handmade's 2010 Deluxe reissue of the album) the songs reflected the respective band members' own musical tastes, which resulted in an eclectic album (although Peter did not have a song on the album). Micky sang the pop songs (e.g., "I'll Be Back Upon My Feet"), and performed a double vocal with Mike on the Nesmith/Allison composed "Auntie's Municipal Court". Davy sang the ballads (e.g., "Daydream Believer" and "We Were Made for Each Other") and Nesmith contributed some experimental songs, like the progressive "Writing Wrongs", the unusual hit song "Tapioca Tundra", and the lo-fi 1920s sound of "Magnolia Simms". This last song is notable for added effects to make it sound like an old record (even including a "record skipping" simulation) made before the Beatles "Honey Pie", which used a similar effect.

Propelled by the hit singles "Daydream Believer" and "Valleri", along with Nesmith's self-penned top 40 hit "Tapioca Tundra", The Birds, The Bees & The Monkees reached No. 3 on the Billboard charts shortly after it was released in April 1968. [49] It was the first album released after NBC announced they were not renewing The Monkees for a third season. The album cover—a quaint collage of items looking like a display in a jumble shop or toy store—was chosen over the Monkees' objections. It was the last Monkees' album to be released in separate, dedicated mono and stereo mixes. [49] During the 1986 reunion, it returned to the Billboard charts for 11 weeks. [35]

During the filming of the second season, the band became tired of scripts which they deemed monotonous and stale. They had already succeeded in eliminating the laugh track (a then-standard on American sitcoms), with the bulk of Season 2 episodes airing minus the canned chuckles. They proposed switching the format of the series to become more like a variety show, with musical guests and live performances. This desire was partially fulfilled within some second-season episodes, with guest stars like musicians Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley and Charlie Smalls (composer of The Wiz) performing on the show. However, NBC was not interested in eliminating the existing format, and the group (except for Peter) had little desire to continue for a third season. Tork said in DVD commentary that everyone had developed such difficult personalities that the big-name stars invited as guests on the show invariably left the experience "hating everybody".

Screen Gems and NBC went ahead with the existing format anyway, commissioning Monkees writers Gerald Gardner and Dee Caruso to create a straight-comedy, no-music half-hour in the Monkees mold a pilot episode was filmed with the then-popular nightclub act the Pickle Brothers. The pilot had the same energy and pace of The Monkees, but never became a series.

In June 1968, Music Supervisor Lester Sill chose to release the two non-album tracks "D.W. Washburn" b/w "It's Nice To Be With You" as the Monkees' next single. [50] The Leiber/Stoller-penned A-side broke into the Top 20, peaking at No. 19 on the charts. [35]

Head Edit

After The Monkees was canceled in February 1968, Rafelson directed the four Monkees in a feature film, Head. Schneider was executive producer, and the project was co-written and co-produced by Bob Rafelson with a then-relatively unknown Jack Nicholson.

The film, conceived and edited in a stream of consciousness style, featured oddball cameo appearances by movie stars Victor Mature, Annette Funicello, a young Teri Garr, boxer Sonny Liston, famous stripper Carol Doda, Green Bay Packers linebacker Ray Nitschke, and musician Frank Zappa. It was filmed at Columbia Pictures' Screen Gems studios and on location in California, Utah, and the Bahamas between February 19 and May 17, 1968 and premiered in New York City on November 6 of that year (the film later debuted in Hollywood on November 20).

The film was not a commercial success, in part because it was the antithesis of The Monkees television show, intended to comprehensively demolish the group's carefully groomed public image. Rafelson and Nicholson's "Ditty Diego-War Chant" (recited at the start of the film by the group) ruthlessly parodies Boyce and Hart's "Monkees Theme". A sparse advertising campaign (with no mention of the Monkees) hurt any chances of the film doing well, and it played briefly in half-filled theaters. In the DVD commentary, Nesmith said that everyone associated with the Monkees "had gone crazy" by this time. They were each using the platform of the Monkees to push their own disparate career goals, to the detriment of the Monkees project. Nesmith added that Head was Rafelson and Nicholson's intentional effort to "kill" the Monkees, so that they would no longer be bothered with the matter. Indeed, Rafelson and Schneider severed all ties to the band amid the bitterness that ensued over the commercial failure of Head. At the time, Rafelson told the press, "I grooved on those four in very special ways while at the same time thinking they had absolutely no talent." [51]

Released in October 1968, the single from the album, "The Porpoise Song", is a psychedelic pop song written by Goffin and King, with lead vocals from Micky Dolenz and backing vocals from Davy Jones, and it reached No. 62 on the Billboard charts. [52]

The soundtrack album to the movie, Head, reached No. 45 on the Billboard charts. [53] Jack Nicholson assembled the film's soundtrack album, weaving dialogue and sound effects from the film in between the songs from the film. The six (plus "Ditty Diego") Monkees songs on the album range from psychedelic pop to straightforward rockers to Broadway rock to eastern-influenced pop to a folk-rock ballad. Although the Monkees performed "Circle Sky" live in the film, the studio version is chosen for the soundtrack album. The live version was later released on various compilations, including Rhino's Missing Links series of Monkees albums. The soundtrack album also includes a song from the film's composer, Ken Thorne. The album had a mylar cover, to give it a mirror-like appearance, so that the person looking at the cover would see his own head, a play on the album title Head. Peter Tork said, "That was something special. [Jack] Nicholson coordinated the record, made it up from the soundtrack. He made it different from the movie. There's a line in the movie where [Frank] Zappa says, 'That's pretty white.' Then there's another line in the movie that was not juxtaposed in the movie, but Nicholson put them together in the [soundtrack album], when Mike says, 'And the same thing goes for Christmas'. that's funny. very different from the movie. that was very important and wonderful that he assembled the record differently from the movie. It was a different artistic experience." [54]

Over the intervening years Head has developed a cult following for its innovative style and anarchic humor. Members of the Monkees, Nesmith in particular, cite the soundtrack album as one of the crowning achievements of the band.

Early 1969: Tork's resignation, Instant Replay and The Monkees Present Edit

Tensions within the group were increasing. Peter Tork, citing exhaustion, quit by buying out the last four years of his Monkees contract at $150,000 per year, equal to about $1,060,000 per year today. This was shortly after the band's Far East tour in December 1968, after completing work on their 1969 NBC television special, 33⅓ Revolutions Per Monkee, which rehashed many of the ideas from Head, only with the Monkees playing a strangely second-string role. In the DVD commentary for the television special, Dolenz noted that after filming was complete, Nesmith gave Tork a gold watch as a going-away present, engraved "From the guys down at work." (Tork kept the back, but replaced the watch several times in later years.) Most of the songs from the 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee TV Special were not officially released until over 40 years later, on the 2010 and 2011 Rhino Handmade Deluxe boxed sets of Head and Instant Replay.

Since the Monkees at this point were producing their own songs with very little of the other band members' involvement, they planned a future double album (eventually to be reduced to The Monkees Present) on which each Monkee would separately produce one side of a disc.

In February 1969, the Monkees' seventh album, Instant Replay, without Tork's involvement beyond playing guitar on "I Won't Be the Same Without Her", was released, which reached No. 32 on the charts. [55] The single from the album was "Tear Drop City", which peaked at No. 56 on the U.S. Billboard chart and No. 34 on the Australian chart. [56] According to Rhino Handmade's 2011 Deluxe Edition reissue of this album, Davy Jones told Melody Maker, "Half of the songs were recorded over the last three years, but there are also about six new ones." The Monkees wanted to please the original 1966 fans by offering up new recordings of some previously unreleased older styled songs, as well as gain a new audience with what they considered a more mature sound. Nesmith continued in his country-rock vein after offering straight ahead rock and experimental songs on the two prior albums. Nesmith stated in Rhino Handmade's 2011 Deluxe Edition reissue, "I guess it was the same embryo beating in me that was somewhere in Don Henley and Glenn Frey and Linda Ronstadt and Neil Young. Everybody who was hanging out in those times. I could just feel this happening that there was this thing. So, I headed off to Nashville to see if I couldn't get some of the Nashville country thing into the rock 'n' roll or vice versa. What I found was that Nashville country was not the country that was going to be the basis of country-rock and that it was Western, Southwest country. It was coming much more out of the Southern California scene. I ended up with a lot of Dobro, mandolin, banjo, and things that were hard-core mountain music stuff . the Nashville cats were so blown out by playin' this kind of music. They loved it, for one thing."

Dolenz contributed the biggest and longest Monkees' production, "Shorty Blackwell", a song inspired by his cat of the same name. [57] Dolenz called it his "feeble attempt at something to do with Sgt. Pepper." [57] Jones contributed an electric guitar rocker, "You and I". Both Jones and Dolenz continued their role of singing on the pop songs. Lyrically, it has a theme of being one of the Monkees' most melancholy albums.

Throughout 1969 the trio appeared as guests on television programs such as The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, The Johnny Cash Show, Hollywood Squares, and Laugh-In (Jones had also appeared on Laugh-In separate from the group). The Monkees also had a contractual obligation to appear in several television commercials with Bugs Bunny for Kool-Aid drink mix as well as Post cereal box singles.

In April 1969, the single "Someday Man" b/w "Listen to the Band" was released, [58] which had the unique distinction of the B-side, a Nesmith composed country-rock song, charting higher (No. 63) than the Jones-sung A-side (No. 81). [35] [58]

The final album with Michael Nesmith, from the Monkees' original incarnation, was their eighth album, The Monkees Present, released in October 1969, which peaked at No. 100 on the Billboard charts. [58] It included the Nesmith composed country-rock singles "Listen to the Band" and "Good Clean Fun" (released in September 1969). [59] Other notable songs include the Dolenz composition "Little Girl", which featured Louie Shelton on electric guitar, joining Micky on acoustic guitar, [60] along with "Mommy and Daddy" (B-side to the "Good Clean Fun" single) in which he sang about America's treatment of the Native Americans and drug abuse, and in an earlier take, released on Rhino Handmade's 2011 Deluxe Edition of Instant Replay, sang about JFK's assassination and the Vietnam war. Jones collaborated with Bill Chadwick on some slower ballads, along with releasing a couple of older upbeat songs from 1966.

In the summer of 1969 the three Monkees embarked on a tour with the backing of the soul band Sam and the Goodtimers. Concerts for this tour were longer sets than their earlier performances tours, with many shows running over two hours. Although the tour was met with some positive critical reception (Billboard in particular praised it), other critics were not favorable of the mixing of the Monkees' pop music with the Goodtimers' R&B approach. Toward the end of the tour, some dates were canceled due to poor ticket sales, and the tour failed to re-establish the band commercially, with no single entering the Top 40 in 1969. Dolenz remarked that the tour "was like kicking a dead horse. The phenomenon had peaked." [61]

April 1970: Nesmith's resignation and Changes Edit

On April 14, 1970, Nesmith joined Dolenz and Jones for the last time as part of the original incarnation of the Monkees to film a Kool-Aid commercial (with the then-newly introduced Nerf balls, thrown around a mock living room by the trio, available as a premium for Kool-Aid labels), [62] with Nesmith leaving the group to continue recording songs with his own country-rock group called Michael Nesmith & The First National Band, which he had started recording with on February 10, 1970. [63] His first album with his own band was called Magnetic South, and at the time he left the Monkees in April, he was recording songs for his second album with The First National Band, called Loose Salute.

This left Dolenz and Jones to record the bubblegum pop album Changes as the ninth and final album by the Monkees released during its original incarnation. By this time, Colgems was hardly putting any effort into the project, and they sent Dolenz and Jones to New York for the Changes sessions, to be produced by Jeff Barry. In comments for the liner notes of the 1994 re-release of Changes, Jones said that he felt they had been tricked into recording an "Andy Kim album" under the Monkees name. Except for the two singers' vocal performances, Changes is the only album that fails to win any significant praise from critics looking back 40 years to the Monkees' recording output. The album spawned the single "Oh My My", which was accompanied by a music film promo (produced/directed by Dolenz). Dolenz contributed one of his own compositions, "Midnight Train", which was used in the re-runs of the Monkees TV series. The "Oh My My" b/w "I Love You Better" single from the Changes album was the last single issued under the Monkees name in the United States until 1986. [64] Originally released in June 1970, [65] Changes first charted in Billboard's Top 200 during the Monkees' 1986 reunion, staying on the charts for 4 weeks. [35]

September 22, 1970 marked the final recording session by the Monkees in their original incarnation, when Jones and Dolenz recorded "Do It in the Name of Love" and "Lady Jane". [66] Not mixed until February 19, 1971, and released later that year as a single ("Do It in the Name Of Love" b/w "Lady Jane"), [20] the two remaining Monkees then lost the rights to use the name in several countries, the U.S. included. The single was not credited to the Monkees in the U.S., but to a misspelled "Mickey Dolenz and Davy Jones", [20] although in Japan it was issued under the Monkees' name.

Jones released a solo album in 1971, titled Davy Jones, featuring the single "Rainy Jane" / "Welcome to My Love". Both Jones and Dolenz released multiple singles as solo artists in the years following the original break-up of the Monkees. The duo continued to tour throughout most of the 1970s.

Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart Edit

Partly because of repeats of the television series The Monkees on Saturday mornings and in syndication, The Monkees Greatest Hits charted in 1976. The LP, issued by Arista Records, who by this time had possession of the Monkees' master tapes, courtesy of their corporate owner, Screen Gems, was actually a re-packaging of an earlier (1972) compilation LP called Refocus that had been issued by Arista's previous label imprint, Bell Records, also owned by Screen Gems. Dolenz and Jones took advantage of this, joining ex-Monkees songwriters Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart to tour the United States. From 1975 to 1977, as the "Golden Hits of the Monkees" show ("The Guys who Wrote 'Em and the Guys who Sang 'Em!"), they successfully performed in smaller venues such as state fairs and amusement parks, as well as making stops in Japan, Thailand, Hong Kong and Singapore. They also released an album of new material as Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart. Nesmith had not been interested in a reunion. Tork claimed later that he had not been asked, although a Christmas single (credited to Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones and Peter Tork due to legal reasons) was produced by Chip Douglas and released on his own label in 1976. The single featured Douglas' and Howard Kaylan's "Christmas Is My Time Of Year" (originally recorded by a 1960s group Christmas Spirit), with a B-side of Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" (Douglas released a remixed version of the single, with additional overdubbed instruments, in 1986). This was the first (albeit unofficial) Monkees single since 1971. Tork also joined Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart on stage at Disneyland in Anaheim, California on July 4, 1976, and also joined Dolenz and Jones on stage at the Starwood in Hollywood in 1977.

Other semi-reunions occurred between 1970 and 1986. Tork helped produce a Dolenz single, "Easy on You"/"Oh Someone" in 1971. Tork also recorded some unreleased tracks for Nesmith's Countryside label during the 1970s, and Dolenz (by then a successful television director in the United Kingdom) directed a segment of Nesmith's TV series Television Parts, although his segment was ultimately not included when the series' six episodes were broadcast by NBC during the summer of 1985.

MTV and Nickelodeon reignite Monkeemania Edit

Brushed off by critics during their heyday in the late 1960s as manufactured and lacking talent, the Monkees experienced a critical and commercial renaissance two decades later. A Monkees TV show marathon ("Pleasant Valley Sunday") was broadcast on February 23, 1986, on the then five-year-old MTV video music channel. In February and March, Tork and Jones played together in Australia. Then in May, Dolenz, Jones, and Tork announced a "20th Anniversary Tour" produced by David Fishof and they began playing North America in June. Their original albums began selling again as Nickelodeon began to run their old series daily. MTV promotion also helped to resurrect a smaller version of Monkeemania, and tour dates grew from smaller to larger venues and became one of the biggest live acts of 1986 and 1987. A new greatest hits collection was issued, reaching platinum status. [67]

By this point, Nesmith was more amenable to a reunion, but forced to sit out most projects because of prior commitments to his Pacific Arts video production company. However, he did appear with the band in a 1986 Christmas medley music video for MTV, and appeared on stage with Dolenz, Jones, and Tork at the Greek Theatre, in Los Angeles, on September 7, 1986. In September 1988, the three rejoined to play Australia again, Europe and then North America, with that string of tours ending in September 1989. Nesmith again returned at the Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles, show on July 10, 1989 and took part in a dedication ceremony at the Hollywood Walk of Fame, when the Monkees received a TV star there in 1989.

The sudden revival of the Monkees in 1986 helped move the first official Monkees single since 1971, "That Was Then, This Is Now", to the No. 20 position in Billboard Magazine. The success, however, was not without controversy. Jones had declined to sing on the track, recorded along with two other new songs included in a compilation album, Then & Now. The Best of The Monkees. Some copies of the single and album credit the new songs to "the Monkees", others as "Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork (of the Monkees)". Reportedly, these recordings were the source of some personal friction between Jones and the others during the 1986 tour Jones typically left the stage when the new songs were performed.

New Monkees Edit

In 1987, a new television series called New Monkees appeared. Other than being centered around a boy band quartet, it bore no resemblance to the earlier series or group. The New Monkees left the air after 13 episodes. (Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider were involved in the production of the series, although it was primarily produced by "Straybert Productions" headed by Steve Blauner, Rafelson and Schneider's partner in BBS Productions.)

1990s reunions Edit

In the 1990s, the Monkees continued to record new material. The band also re-issued all the original LPs on CD, each of which included between three and six bonus tracks of previously unreleased songs or alternate takes the first editions came with collectable trading cards.

Dolenz, Jones and Tork appeared in a 1995 episode of Boy Meets World, but not as themselves Tork appeared in two episodes as Topanga Lawrence's father Jedediah. The trio also appeared together, as themselves, in the 1995 film The Brady Bunch Movie.

Their eleventh album Justus was released in 1996. It was the first since 1968 on which all four original members performed and produced. Justus was produced by the Monkees, all songs were written by one of the four Monkees, and it was recorded using only the four Monkees for all instruments and vocals, which was the inspiration for the album title and spelling (Justus = Just Us).

The trio of Dolenz, Jones, and Tork reunited again for a successful 30th anniversary tour of American amphitheaters in 1996, while Nesmith joined them onstage in Los Angeles to promote the new songs from Justus. For the first time since the brief 1986 reunion, Nesmith returned to the concert stage for a tour of the United Kingdom in 1997, highlighted by two sold-out concerts at Wembley Arena in Wembley Park, London. This was a very fitting venue, as from 30 June to 2 July 1967 the Monkees had been the first group to headline on their own at the Empire Pool, as the Arena was then called. [68]

The full quartet also appeared in an ABC television special titled Hey, Hey, It's the Monkees, which was written and directed by Nesmith and spoofed the original series that had made them famous. Following the UK tour, Nesmith declined to continue future performances with the Monkees, having faced harsh criticism from the British music press for his deteriorating musicianship. Tork noted in DVD commentary that "In 1966, Nesmith had learned a reasonably good version of the famous 'Last Train to Clarksville' guitar lick, but in 1996, Mike was no longer able to play it" and so Tork took over the lead guitar parts.

Nesmith's departure from the tour was acrimonious. Jones was quoted by the Los Angeles Times as complaining that Nesmith "made a new album with us. He toured Great Britain with us. Then all of a sudden, he's not here. Later, I hear rumors he's writing a script for our next movie. Oh, really? That's bloody news to me. He's always been this aloof, inaccessible person. the fourth part of the jigsaw puzzle that never quite fit in." [69]

2000s reunions Edit

Tork, Jones, and Dolenz toured the United States in 1997, after which the group took another hiatus until 2001 when they once again reunited to tour the United States. However, this tour was also accompanied by public sniping. Dolenz and Jones had announced that they had "fired" Tork for his constant complaining and threatening to quit. Tork was quoted as saying that, as well as the fact he wanted to tour with his own band, "Shoe Suede Blues." Tork told WENN News he was troubled by the overindulgence in alcohol by other members of the tour crew:

Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones fired me just before the last two shows of our 35th anniversary tour. I'm both happy and sad over the whole thing. I always loved the work onstage—but I just couldn't handle the backstage problems. I'd given them 30 days notice that I was leaving so my position is that I resigned first and then they dropped me. Thank God I don't need the Monkees anymore. I'm a recovering alcoholic and haven't had a drink in several years. I'm not against people drinking—just when they get mean and abusive. I went on the anniversary tour with the agreement that I didn't have to put up with drinking and difficult behavior offstage. When things weren't getting better, I gave the guys notice that I was leaving in 30 days for good. [70]

Tork later stated in 2011 that the alcohol played only a small role and Tork then said, "I take full responsibility for the backstage problems on the 2001 tour. We were getting along pretty well until I had a meltdown. I ticked the other guys off good and proper and it was a serious mistake on my part. I was not in charge of myself to the best of my ability – the way I hope I have become since. I really just behaved inappropriately, honestly. I apologized to them." [71]

Jones and Dolenz went on to tour the United Kingdom in 2002, but Tork declined to participate. Jones and Dolenz toured the United States one more time as a duo in 2002, and then split to concentrate on their own individual projects. With different Monkees citing different reasons, the group chose not to mark their 40th anniversary in 2006.

2010–2011 reunions Edit

In October 2010, Jones stated that a reunion marking the band's 45th anniversary was a possibility. [72] Monkees biographer Andrew Sandoval commented in The Hollywood Reporter that he "spent three years cajoling them to look beyond their recent differences (which included putting aside solo projects to fully commit to the Monkees)." [15] An Evening with The Monkees: The 45th Anniversary Tour commenced on May 12, 2011 in Liverpool, England, [73] before moving to North America in June and July for a total of 43 performances. [74] Sandoval noted, "Their mixed feelings on the music business and their long and winding relationship weighed heavily, but once they hit the stage, the old magic was apparent. For the next three months. [they brought] the music and memories to fans in the band's grandest stage show in decades. Images from their series and films flashed on a huge screen behind them even Rolling Stone, whose owner, Jann Wenner, has vowed to keep them out of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, gushed." [15] Nesmith did not take part in the tour, which grossed approximately $4 million. [75]

On August 8, 2011, the band cancelled ten last-minute shows due to what was initially reported as "internal group issues and conflicts", [76] though Tork later confirmed "there were some business affairs that couldn't be coordinated correctly. We hit a glitch and there was just this weird dislocation at one point." [77] Jones clarified that "the (45th Anniversary) tour was only supposed to go until July. And it was great, the best time we've had because we're all on the same page now. We jelled onstage and off. But then more dates were being added. And more. And then the next thing we knew, they were talking about Japan, Australia, Brazil, and we were like, 'Wait a second. This is turning into something more than a tour.' We were doing 40 songs a night, plus other material. Some of these shows were 2 1 ⁄ 2 hours long. Then there was the travel, getting to the next venue with no time to revive. The audiences were great. But, let's face it, we're not kids." [78]

Death of Jones and reunion with Nesmith Edit

The 45th anniversary tour was the last with Jones, who died of a heart attack at age 66 on February 29, 2012. [79] [80] Soon thereafter, rumors began to circulate that Nesmith would reunite with Dolenz and Tork in the wake of Jones' death. [81] This was confirmed on August 8, 2012, when the surviving trio announced a series of U.S. shows for November and December, commencing in Escondido, California and concluding in New York City. The brief tour marked the first time Nesmith performed with the Monkees since 1997, as well as the first without Jones. [82] Jones' memory was honored throughout the shows via recordings and video. During one point, the band went quiet and a recording of Jones singing "I Wanna Be Free" played while footage of him was screening behind the band. For Jones' signature song, "Daydream Believer", Dolenz said that the band had discussed who should sing the song and had concluded that it should be the fans, saying "It doesn't belong to us anymore. It belongs to you." [83]

The Fall 2012 tour was very well received by both fans and critics, resulting in the band's scheduling a 24-date summer tour for 2013. Dubbed "A Midsummer’s Night With the Monkees", concerts also featured Nesmith, Dolenz, and Tork. "The reaction to the last tour was euphoric", Dolenz told Rolling Stone magazine. "It was pretty apparent there was a demand for another one." [84] A third tour with Nesmith followed in 2014.

In 2014, the Monkees were inducted into the Pop Music Hall of Fame at the 2014 Monkees Convention. [85] At the convention the band announced a 2014 tour of the Eastern and Midwestern US. [86] [87]

Good Times! and 50th anniversary: 2015–2017 Edit

Dolenz and Tork toured as the Monkees in 2015 without Nesmith's participation. Nesmith stated that he was busy with other ventures, although Dolenz said that "He's always invited." [88] In February 2016, Dolenz announced that the Monkees would be releasing a new album, titled Good Times!, as a celebration of their 50th anniversary. Good Times!, produced by Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of Wayne, features contributions by all three surviving members, as well as a posthumous contribution from Jones. [89] The album was released in May 2016 to considerable success, reaching No. 14 on the Billboard 200 [90] and generally favorable reviews.

With the release of the album, the band, featuring Dolenz and Tork, commenced their 50th anniversary tour. Nesmith did not participate in most of the tour, again citing other commitments. He did, however, make a few appearances throughout the summer of 2016, appearing virtually via Skype to perform "Papa Gene's Blues" at one concert and in person for a four-song encore at another. In September, he replaced Tork on the tour for two dates while Tork attended to a family emergency. After Tork returned to the tour, Nesmith performed with the band for a concert at the Pantages Theatre in Hollywood on September 16, which he stated would likely be his final concert appearance with the Monkees. [91] Dolenz and Tork's tour announced dates to the end of the year, including concerts in Australia and New Zealand.

After the end of the 50th anniversary tour, Dolenz, Tork, and Nesmith spent 2017 engaging in solo activities.

Christmas Party, The Monkees Present: The Mike and Micky Show, Tork's death, farewell tour and disbandment (2017–present) Edit

In 2018, Nesmith toured with a revived version of the First National Band and stated that he was in negotiations with promoters to tour again with Dolenz later in the summer. [92] On February 20, the tour was announced as "The Monkees Present: The Mike and Micky Show", their first tour as a duo Tork declined to participate due to wanting to focus on his new solo album. Though the pair played Monkees music and promoted the tour under the Monkees banner, Nesmith stated that "there's no pretense there about Micky and I being the Monkees. We're not." [93]

The tour was cut short in June 2018, with four shows left unplayed, due to Nesmith having a health issue. He and Dolenz announced March 2019 as make-up dates for the missed shows. [94] In an interview with Rolling Stone published on July 26, 2018, Nesmith revealed he had undergone quadruple bypass heart surgery. He was in the hospital for over a month and the health issue had persisted since early in the tour. Nesmith resumed live touring with his First National Band Redux shows in September 2018. In November 2018, Nesmith and Dolenz announced an additional eight shows had been added to the Mike and Micky Show tour. [95] In June 2019, Nesmith and Dolenz toured the Mike and Micky Show in Australia and New Zealand.

The Monkees released a Christmas album, Christmas Party, [96] on October 12, 2018. The Adam Schlesinger-produced album features contributions from Andy Partridge, Scott McCaughey and author Michael Chabon. In addition to newly recorded material from the three surviving Monkees, two songs feature vocals from Davy Jones. [97] The cover art is provided by the comic book artists Mike and Laura Allred.

Peter Tork died of cancer on February 21, 2019. [98]

Following the success of the Mike and Micky Show, Dolenz and Nesmith announced a follow-up tour, An Evening with the Monkees, to begin in early 2020. [99] The tour was delayed, however, due the COVID-19 pandemic. It was announced on May 4, 2021 that the Monkees will disband following a farewell tour in the United States consisting of Michael Nesmith and Mickey Dolenz. "The Monkees Farewell Tour" will consist of over 40 dates in the US from September to November however because of restrictions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, they will not be playing shows in Canada, the UK or Australia. The final date and final show for the Monkees will be held on November 14, 2021 at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. [100] [101]

Studio recordings controversy Edit

Controversy hit early in 1967 concerning the Monkees' studio abilities. Dolenz told a reporter that the Wrecking Crew provided the backing tracks for the first two Monkees albums, and that his origin as a drummer was simply that a Monkee had to learn to play the drums, and he only knew the guitar. [102] A January 28, 1967 Saturday Evening Post article quoted Nesmith railing against the music creation process. "Do you know how debilitating it is to sit up and have to duplicate somebody else’s records?" he asked. "Tell the world we don’t record our own music." [103] The whistle-blowing on themselves worked to force producer Don Kirshner out of the project, and the band took creative control for its third album.

But the Monkees toured the U.K. in 1967 and found a chilly reception. The front pages of several U.K. and international music papers proclaimed that the group members did not always play their own instruments or sing the backing vocals in the studio. They were derisively dubbed the "Pre-Fab Four" and the Sunday Mirror called them a "disgrace to the pop world". [104] Jimi Hendrix was their tour-opener that year, and he told Melody Maker magazine, "Oh God, I hate them! Dishwater… You can't knock anybody for making it, but people like the Monkees?" [105] Dealing with the controversy proved challenging on the television series. Episode No. 31, "Monkees at the Movies", first aired in April 1967 and Bob Rafelson asked the group about accusations that they did not play their instruments in concert. Nesmith responded, "I'm fixin' to walk out there in front of fifteen thousand people, man! If I don't play my own instrument, I'm in a lot of trouble!" [106] But the "Devil and Peter Tork" episode serves as a parable, as a Kirshner-like entrepreneur has Tork sign over his soul to be a success as a musician. [107]

In November 1967, the wave of anti-Monkees sentiment was reaching its peak while they released their fourth album, Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, & Jones Ltd. The liner notes for the 1995 re-release of this album quote Nesmith: "The press went into a full-scale war against us, talking about how 'The Monkees are four guys who have no credits, no credibility whatsoever and have been trying to trick us into believing they are a rock band.' Number 1, not only was this not the case the reverse was true. Number 2, for the press to report with genuine alarm that the Monkees were not a real rock band was looney tunes! It was one of the great goofball moments of the media, but it stuck." [108] Jones stated in 1969 to Tiger Beat, "I get so angry when musicians say, 'Oh, your music is so bad', because it's not bad to the kids. Those people who talk about 'doing their own thing' are groups that go and play in the clubs that hold 50 people, while we're playing to 10,000 kids. You know, it hurts me to think that anybody thinks we're phony, because we're not. We're only doing what we think is our own thing." [109]

Rolling Stone reported on October 11, 2011, that Tork believed the Monkees did not receive the respect they deserve. "The Monkees' songbook is one of the better songbooks in pop history", he said. "Certainly in the top five in terms of breadth and depth. It was revealed that we didn't play our own instruments on the records much at the very moment when the idealism of early Beatlemania in rock was at its peak. So we became the ultimate betrayers." [110]

Timeline for the studio recordings controversy Edit

  • 1962: Jones lands the part of Michael in the stage show Peter Pan, in which he is coached on the tone of his voice. [10] Later that year, he lands the role of the Artful Dodger in the Broadway musical production of Oliver![10] Nesmith receives his first guitar during Christmas of 1962. [10] He will build his proficiency with it to rehabilitate his hands after they are injured. Tork takes part in folk ensembles. [10] The initial idea for The Monkees is developed. [10]
  • 1963: Tork moves to New York's Greenwich Village to play in various folk groups in music "basket" houses, where money is collected after each performance. [14] While still performing in the musical Oliver!, Jones makes his first studio recordings of demonstration tapes of his singing. [14] He is also nominated for a Tony award. [14] Nesmith performs solo and with folk groups and releases his first recording. [14]
  • 1964: Dolenz plays guitar and sings in his first band, the Missing Links. [111] Dolenz had started playing Spanish guitar when he was 10–12 years old. [112] Jones signs recording contract with Colpix Records. [111] He appears on The Ed Sullivan Show on the same night as the Beatles. [11] This will bring him to the attention of Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider. Nesmith wins Headliner of the Year talent contest performing with John London. [111] Tork tours with folk group. [111]
  • 1965: Jones's first singles and album are released. [113] He appears on Dick Clark's Where the Action Is. [114] Nesmith releases more singles and plays with folk group. [113] He records for Colpix. [113]Record World gives one of Nesmith's singles a four star review. [115] He appears on a couple of TV shows performing music. [116] Tork still performs in Greenwich Village clubs. [113] Dolenz sings on stage.
    At the end of the year, the four Monkees are cast in the TV show. Rafelson: "It's often been said that the Monkees were manufactured, but the term irritates me just a little bit. The Monkees were more like a Japanese marriage: arranged. In America and elsewhere the divorce rate is pretty high, but in Japan things go better." [116]
  • April 1966: The Monkees begin rehearsing as a band to produce music for the upcoming TV show and records. Nesmith, Dolenz, and Tork were all experienced guitar players, and Nesmith and Tork were a little familiar with drums, but no one was a real expert in drumming. Jones was an able drummer and percussionist, but his experience from Broadway made him more known as a singer. Producer Ward Sylvester tells Tork that he would have signed the band even without a TV show. [19]
  • May 1966: Filming for the TV show starts, taking 12 hours a day for the cast of the Monkees. The public is informed in the beginning that the Monkees are "manufactured", as seen in this Washington Post report: "The series stars a fearsome foursome in the Monkees, a wholly manufactured singing group of attractive young men who come off as a combination of the Beatles, the Dead End Kids and the Marx Brothers. Critics will cry foul. Longhairs will demand, outraged, that they be removed from the air. But the kids will adore the Monkees [. ] unlike other rock 'n' roll groups, the boys had never performed together before. Indeed, they'd never even met [. ] they've been working to create their own sound." [19]
  • June 1966: Although the producers want the Monkees to create their own music, they had not progressed enough by this point and still lacked the "upbeat, young, happy, driving, pulsating sound" that they desired. [19] Dolenz stated, "I'm sure that Rafelson and Schneider said in all honesty, 'Yeah, don't worry, when we start going you're gonna record your own tunes and it will be wonderful.' But the things get caught up in the inertia of the moment. NBC gets involved. RCA gets involved. Screen Gems gets involved. Millions and millions of dollars are on the line [. ] people aren't as forthcoming. Mike's style was very distinct, country-western, Peter was very folk-rock, neither of which at the time would have been considered mainstream pop. Davy would have done all Broadway tunes [. ] I ended up singing the leads [. ] pop-rock was more my style." [117] However, they used selections of Nesmith's authorship and composition from the beginning. [118]
  • June 10, 1966: The Monkees' first recording sessions take place. These sessions feature members of the Wrecking Crew, a group of studio musicians in Los Angeles who played on several Monkees album tracks, mostly those produced by Nesmith. These sessions were unsuccessful, however, and most future sessions in 1966 featured the Candy Store Prophets, a studio band led by Boyce & Hart. [1]
  • June 25, 1966: Nesmith produces his first Monkees track in a recording studio, his two self-composed songs "All the King's Horses", "The Kind of Girl I Could Love", plus "I Don't Think You Know Me", as a way for Raybert Productions to fulfill their promise to him to allow him to produce and record his own music. [1] He is not allowed to play the instruments. [1]
  • July 1966: Various producers from Boyce & Hart to Jack Keller to Nesmith continue to record sessions. Nesmith gets all four members to sing on his productions. On July 18, 1966 Nesmith also gets Tork to play guitar on the songs he is producing for the first time. [119] Sessions continue in this manner, with the hired producers Boyce & Hart and Jack Keller and Monkees member Nesmith producing/recording songs in the studio through November 1966.[120]
  • August 1966: The Monkees' first single is released.
  • September 1966: The Monkees' TV show premieres. [121]
  • October 1966: The Monkees' debut album is released. Group member Nesmith, in particular, is angered when he sees the album cover, because he thinks it makes it look like they played all of the instruments.
  • October 2, 1966: The Monkees give their first public interview, which appears in The New York Times, in which Jones is asked if the big push for the Monkees is fair to the real rock groups, to which he responds, ". That's the breaks, but you can't fool the people, you really can't." [20]
  • October 24, 1966:Newsweek interviews the Monkees. They are asked how the music is created. Davy Jones tells them, "This isn't a rock 'n' roll group. This is an act." [122]
  • December 1966: The Monkees perform live in concert starting December 3, 1966. TV Week in the meantime, interviews Rafelson about why the Monkees' public access to interviews is limited, wondering if it could be related to embarrassing questions regarding their musical prowess, to which Rafelson assures that they do all of their own playing and singing. [123] He also states that interviews are almost impossible due to their spending 12 hours a day filming the TV show, 4 hours recording, rehearsing for concert tours, and spending some weekends making personal appearance tours. [122] During this time frame, the Monkees are generally barred from making television appearances on shows outside of their own, as Raybert fears the group's overexposure. [124]
  • December 27, 1966: The Monkees are again interviewed about their music in Look magazine. Tork responds, "We have the potential, but there's not time to practice." [125] Dolenz says, "We're advertisers. We're selling the Monkees. It's gotta be that way." [125] Nesmith says, "They're in the middle of something good and they're trying to sell something. They want us to be the Beatles, but we're not. We're us. We're funny." [125]
  • December 28, 1966:Weekly Variety reports that the Monkees are selling faster than the Beatles did at their launch. [125]
  • January 1967: The Monkees' second album is released while they were on tour, without the Monkees' knowledge. This upsets Nesmith and Tork, as they had been told that they were going to be doing their own album. [33] Dolenz and Jones are initially indifferent because to them, coming from the acting world, it was just a soundtrack to the TV show and they were doing their job by singing what they were asked to sing. But when they saw how angry Nesmith and Tork were, they too joined in that anger. [33]
  • January 16, 1967: Four months after their first single is released, the Monkees hold their first recording session as a self-contained, fully functioning band.
  • January 28, 1967: Band member Nesmith speaks to the Saturday Evening Post in an exposé, stating, "The music had nothing to do with us. It was totally dishonest. Do you know how debilitating it is to sit up and have to duplicate somebody else's records? That's really what we're doing. The music happened in spite of the Monkees. It was what Kirshner wanted to do. Our records are not our forte. I don't care if we never sell another record. Maybe we were manufactured [. ] Tell the world we're synthetic because [. ] we are. Tell them the Monkees are wholly man-made overnight, that millions of dollars have been poured into this thing. Tell the world we don't record our own music. But that's us they see on television. That show is really a part of us. They're not seeing something invalid." [33] Decades later, Nesmith reflected, "The press decided they were going to unload on us as being somehow illegitimate, somehow false. That we were making an attempt to dupe the public, when in fact it was me that was making the attempt to maintain the integrity. So, the press went into a full-scale war against us. Telling us the Monkees are four guys who have no credits, no credibility whatsoever, who have been trying to trick us into believing that they are a rock band. Number one, not only was it not the case, the reverse was true. Number two, [for] the press to report with genuine alarm that the Monkees were not a real rock band was looney tunes. It was one of the great goofball moments of the media, but it stuck." [108]
  • February 4, 1967: Although the Monkees have continued to play and record their own music for their upcoming album, Jones records some songs with hired producer Jeff Barry. [126]
  • February 1967: Kirshner works behind the Monkees' backs to release another single without the band's knowledge. [127]
  • February 25, 1967: Jones is interviewed for the New Musical Express, and says, "I can only speak for myself. I am an actor and I have never pretended to be anything else. The public have made me into a rock 'n' roll singer. No one is trying to fool anyone! People have tried to put us down by saying we copied the Beatles. So, all right, maybe the Monkees is a half-hour Hard Day's Night. But now we read that the Who are working on a TV series around a group. Now who's copying who?" [127]
  • February 27, 1967: Kirshner is dismissed as Music Coordinator for the Monkees, primarily due to his handling of the third would-be-but-withdrawn single from the Monkees. Lester Sill takes his place. The Monkees continue recording their own songs, with them playing instruments, getting ready for their next album. In the meantime, the Nesmith-penned "The Girl I Knew Somewhere" is released as part of the Monkees third single, which features the Monkees playing as a self-contained band, which becomes a top 40 hit. [37]
  • May 1967: The Monkees' first self-made album, Headquarters, is released.

After Headquarters, the Monkees started using a mixture of themselves playing along with other musicians, including members of the Wrecking Crew and Candy Store Prophets along with other musicians such as Stephen Stills, Neil Young, and Harry Nilsson but they still wrote, sang, produced, and played on their remaining albums, except for their final offering from the original incarnation in 1970, Changes, which was recorded after Nesmith and Tork had left the group and featured Dolenz and Jones singing to the backing tracks of what Jones referred to in the liner notes of the 1994 reissue that album as "a rejected Andy Kim album". In the same liner notes, Jones stated that he was unhappy about that recording and claimed that it was not a real album. The final album featured one Dolenz composition.

Tork commented on some of the controversy when writing about Jones's death: "When we first met, I was confronted with a slick, accomplished, young performer, vastly more experienced than I in the ways of show biz, and yes, I was intimidated. Englishness was at a high premium in my world, and his experience dwarfed my entertainer's life as a hippie, basket-passing folk singer on the Greenwich Village coffee house circuit. If anything, I suppose I was selected for the cast of 'The Monkees' TV show partly as a rough-hewn counterpart to David's sophistication. [. ] the Monkees—the group now, not the TV series—took a lot of flack for being 'manufactured,' by which our critics meant that we hadn't grown up together, paying our dues, sleeping five to a room, trying to make it as had the Beatles and Rolling Stones. Furthermore, critics said, the Monkees' first albums—remember albums?—were almost entirely recorded by professional studio musicians, with hardly any input from any of us beyond lead vocals. I felt this criticism keenly, coming as I did from the world of the ethical folk singer, basically honoring the standards of the naysayers. We did play as a group live on tour." [128]

Meeting with the Beatles Edit

Critics of the Monkees observed that they were simply the "Pre-Fab Four", a made-for-TV knockoff of the Beatles however, the Beatles themselves took it in stride and even hosted a party for the Monkees when they visited England. The Beatles were recording Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band at the time of the Monkees' visit and as such, the party inspired the line in the Monkees' tune "Randy Scouse Git", written by Dolenz, which read, "the four kings of EMI are sitting stately on the floor."

George Harrison praised their self-produced musical attempts, saying, "It's obvious what's happening, there's talent there. They're doing a TV show, it's a difficult chore and I wouldn't be in their shoes for the world. When they get it all sorted out, they might turn out to be the best." [2] (Monkees member Peter Tork was later one of the musicians on Harrison's album Wonderwall Music, playing Paul McCartney's five-string banjo. [129] )

Nesmith attended the Beatles' recording session for "A Day in the Life" at Abbey Road Studios he can be seen in the Beatles' home movies, including one scene where he is talking with John Lennon. During the conversation, Nesmith had reportedly asked Lennon "Do you think we're a cheap imitation of the Beatles, your movies and your records?" to which Lennon assuredly replied, "I think you're the greatest comic talent since the Marx Brothers. I've never missed one of your programs." [2] Nesmith wrote about this encounter on Facebook:

When the Beatles were recording Sgt. Peppers, Phyllis and I spent a few days with John and wife Cynthia Lennon at their home, and one in the studio with "the boys." That's where those pictures of John and I come from—the "Day in the Life" session. The minute I had the wherewithal—cachet and money—I raced to London and looked up John.

During the '60s it seemed to me London was the center of the World and the Beatles were the center of London and the Sgt Pepper session was the center of the Beatles. It was an extraordinary time, I thought, and I wanted to get as close as I could to the heart of it. But like a hurricane the center was not stormy or tumultuous. It was exciting, but it was calm, and to an extent peaceful. The confidence of the art permeated the atmosphere. Serene—and really, really fun. Then I discovered the reason for this. During that time in one of our longer, more reflective, talks I realized that John was not aware of who the Beatles were. Of course he could not be. He was clueless in this regard. He had never seen or experienced them. In the strange paradox of fame, none of the Beatles ever saw the Beatles the way we did. Certainly not the way I did. I loved them beyond my ability to express it. As the years passed and I met more and more exceptional people sitting in the center of their own hurricane I saw they all shared this same sensibility. None of them could actually know the force of their own work. [130]

Dolenz was also in the studio during a Sgt. Pepper session, which he mentioned while broadcasting for radio WCBS-FM in New York (incidentally, he interviewed Ringo Starr on his program). On February 21, 1967, he attended the overdub and mixing session for the Beatles' "Fixing a Hole" at EMI's Abbey Road studio 2. [131]

During the 1970s, during Lennon's infamous "lost weekend", Lennon, Ringo Starr, Micky Dolenz, Harry Nilsson and Keith Moon often hung out together, and were collectively known in the press as "The Hollywood Vampires". [132]

Paul McCartney can be seen in the 2002 concert film Back in the U.S. singing "Hey, Hey, We're The Monkees", the theme from The Monkees television show, while backstage.

The Monkees "Cuddly Toy" and "Daddy's Song" were written by songwriter Harry Nilsson. "Cuddly Toy" was recorded several months before Nilsson's own debut in October 1967. [42] At the press conference announcing the formation of Apple, the Beatles named Nilsson as both their favorite American artist and as their favorite American group. Derek Taylor, the Beatles' press officer, had introduced them to Nilsson's music. [133]

In 1995, Ringo Starr joined Jones, Tork and Dolenz to film a Pizza Hut commercial. [134]

Julian Lennon was a fan, stating at the time of Jones' death, "You did some great work!" [135]

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Edit

In June 2007, Tork complained to the New York Post that Jann Wenner had blackballed the Monkees from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio. Tork stated:

[Wenner] doesn't care what the rules are and just operates how he sees fit. It is an abuse of power. I don't know whether the Monkees belong in the Hall of Fame, but it's pretty clear that we're not in there because of a personal whim. Jann seems to have taken it harder than everyone else, and now, 40 years later, everybody says, 'What's the big deal? Everybody else does it.' [Uses studio artists or backing bands.] Nobody cares now except him. He feels his moral judgment in 1967 and 1968 is supposed to serve in 2007.

In a Facebook post, Nesmith stated that he does not know if the Monkees belong in the Hall of Fame because he can only see the impact of the Monkees from the inside, and further stated: "I can see the HOF (Hall of Fame) is a private enterprise. It seems to operate as a business, and the inductees are there by some action of the owners of the Enterprise. The inductees appear to be chosen at the owner's pleasure. This seems proper to me. It is their business in any case. It does not seem to me that the HOF carries a public mandate, nor should it be compelled to conform to one." [130]

In 1992, Davy Jones spoke to People magazine, stating "I'm not as wealthy as some entertainers, but I work hard, and I think the best is yet to come. I know I'm never going to make the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but maybe there's something else for me in show business. I've been given a talent—however big or little—that has given me many opportunities. I've got to try to use it the best way I can. A lot of people go days without having someone hug them or shake their hand. I get that all the time." [136]

In 2015, Micky Dolenz said, "As far as the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame I’ve never been one to chase awards or anything like that it’s never been very important to me. I was very proud to win an Emmy for The Monkees, having come out of television as a kid. When we won the Emmy for best TV show in '66 or '67 that was a huge feather in my cap. But I’ve never chased that kind of stuff. I’ve never done a project and thought, 'What do I do here to win an award?' Specifically as far as the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame I’ve been very flattered that the fans and people have championed the Monkees. Very flattered and honored that they do. If you know anything about the organization, and I’ve done charity work for the foundation, the Hall of Fame is a private club." [137]

Various magazines and news outlets, such as Time, [138] NPR, [139] The Christian Science Monitor, [140] Goldmine, [141] [142] Yahoo! Music [143] and MSNBC [144] have argued that the Monkees belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Beginning in 1987, Rhino Records started to make available previously unreleased Monkees recordings on a series of albums called Missing Links. Having numerous quality songwriters, musicians, producers and arrangers—along with high budgets—at their hands while making albums during the 1960s, the band was able to record as many songs as the Beatles in half the time.

The three volumes of this initial series contained 59 songs. These include the group's first recordings as a self-contained band, including the intended single "All Of Your Toys", Nesmith's Nashville sessions, and alternate versions of songs featured only on the television series. The Listen to the Band box set also contained previously unreleased recordings, as did the 1994–95 series CD album reissues. Rhino/Rhino Handmade's Deluxe Edition reissue series has also included alternate mixes, unreleased songs, and the soundtrack to 33⅓ Revolutions per Monkee.

    – lead and backing vocals, rhythm guitar, drums, percussion (1966–1971, 1976, 1986–1989, 1996–1997, 2001–2002, 2011–present) – lead guitar, keyboards, rhythm guitar, backing and lead vocals (1966–1970, 1986, 1989, 1996–1997, 2012–2014, 2016, 2018–present)
    – lead and backing vocals, percussion, drums, rhythm guitar, bass, keyboards (1966–1971, 1976, 1986–1989, 1996–1997, 2001–2002, 2011–2012 died 2012) – bass, rhythm guitar, keyboards, lead guitar, banjo, backing and occasional lead vocals (1966–1968, 1976, 1986–1989, 1996–1997, 2001, 2011–2018 died 2019)

Timeline Edit

The Monkees, selected specifically to appeal to the youth market as American television's response to the Beatles [145] with their manufactured personae and carefully produced singles, are seen as an original precursor to the modern proliferation of studio and corporation-created bands. But this critical reputation has softened somewhat, with the recognition that the Monkees were neither the first manufactured group nor unusual in this respect. The Monkees also frequently contributed their own songwriting efforts on their albums and saw their musical skills improve. They ultimately became a self-directed group, playing their own instruments and writing many of their own songs.

Monkees and 1960s music historian Andrew Sandoval wrote in The Hollywood Reporter that the Monkees "pioneered the music video format [and band member Mike Nesmith dreamed up the prototype for what became MTV] and paved the way for every boy band that followed in their wake, from New Kids on the Block to 'N Sync to the Jonas Brothers, while Davy set the stage for future teen idols David Cassidy and Justin Bieber. As pop stars go, you would be hard pressed to find a successful artist who didn't take a page from the Monkees' playbook, even generations later. Monkee money also enabled Rafelson and Schneider to finance Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces, which made Jack Nicholson a star. In fact, the Monkees series was the opening salvo in a revolution that brought on the New Hollywood cinema, an influence rarely acknowledged but no less impactful." [15]

The Chicago Tribune interviewed Davy Jones, who said, "We touched a lot of musicians, you know. I can't tell you the amount of people that have come up and said, 'I wouldn't have been a musician if it hadn't been for the Monkees.' It baffles me even now", Jones added. "I met a guy from Guns N' Roses, and he was overwhelmed by the meeting, and was just so complimentary." [146]

The Monkees found unlikely fans among musicians of the punk rock period of the mid-1970s. Many of these punk performers had grown up on TV reruns of the series, and sympathized with the anti-industry, anti-establishment trend of their career. Sex Pistols and Minor Threat both recorded versions of "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" and it was often played live by Toy Love. Japanese new wave pop group the Plastics recorded a synthesizer and drum-machine version of "Last Train to Clarksville" for their 1979 album Welcome Back.

Glenn A. Baker, author of Monkeemania: The True Story of the Monkees, described the Monkees as "rock's first great embarrassment" in 1986:

Like an illegitimate child in a respectable family, the Monkees are destined to be regarded forever as rock's first great embarrassment misunderstood and maligned like a mongrel at a ritzy dog show, or a test tube baby at the Vatican. The rise of the pre-fab four coincided with rock's desperate desire to cloak itself with the trappings of respectability, credibility and irreproachable heritage. The fact was ignored that session players were being heavily employed by the Beach Boys, the Beatles, the Mamas and the Papas, the Byrds and other titans of the age. However, what could not be ignored, as rock disdained its pubescent past, was a group of middle-aged Hollywood businessmen had actually assembled their concept of a profitable rock group and foisted it upon the world. What mattered was that the Monkees had success handed to them on a silver plate. Indeed, it was not so much righteous indignation but thinly disguised jealousy which motivated the scornful dismissal of what must, in retrospect, be seen as entertaining, imaginative and highly memorable exercise in pop culture. [2]

Mediaite columnist Paul Levinson noted that "The Monkees were the first example of something created in a medium—in this case, a rock group on television—that jumped off the screen to have big impact in the real world." [147]

When commenting on the death of Jones on February 29, 2012, Time magazine contributor James Poniewozik praised the television show, saying that "even if the show never meant to be more than entertainment and a hit-single generator, we shouldn't sell The Monkees short. It was far better TV than it had to be during an era of formulaic domestic sitcoms and wacky comedies, it was a stylistically ambitious show, with a distinctive visual style, absurdist sense of humor and unusual story structure. Whatever Jones and the Monkees were meant to be, they became creative artists in their own right, and Jones' chipper Brit-pop presence was a big reason they were able to produce work that was commercial, wholesome and yet impressively weird.

"Both the style and substance of the Monkees were imitated by American boy band Big Time Rush (BTR), who performed in their own television series which -- by admission of series creator Scott Fellows -- was heavily influenced by the Monkees. Similarly to the Monkees, Big Time Rush featured a "made-for-tv" boy band often caught in a series of misadventures, hijinks, and somewhat slapstick comedy. The show, now in reruns but still hugely popular on Teen Nick, is highly stylized and patterned after the Monkees, even capped with similar cartoonish sound effects. Like the Monkees, BTR has also seen critical and commercial success in America and worldwide through album, singles and high TV ratings worldwide." [148]

In popular culture Edit

The Criterion Collection, which has a stated goal to release "a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films, [and] has been dedicated to gathering the greatest films from around the world and publishing them in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements" [149] recognized the Monkees' film Head as meeting their criteria when they fully restored and released it on DVD and Blu-ray in 2010. They stated that Head was "way, way ahead of its time" and "arguably the most authentically psychedelic film made in 1960s Hollywood". [150] Head dodged commercial success on its release but has since been reclaimed as one of the great cult objects of its era." [151]

In the book Hey, Hey We're The Monkees, Rafelson wrote that "[Head] explored techniques on film that hadn't been used before. The first shot of Micky under water is a perfect example. Now you see it on MTV all the time, but it was invented for the movie [. ] I got two long-haired kids out of UCLA who created the effects that the established laboratory guys said couldn't be done. We invented double-matted experiences. Polarization hadn't been used in movies before. . When it was shown in France, the head of the Cinematheque overly praised the movie as a cinematic masterpiece, and from that point on, this movie began to acquire an underground reputation." [152] In 2010, Nick Vernier Band created a digital "Monkees reunion" through the release of Mister Bob (featuring the Monkees), [153] a new song produced under license from Rhino Entertainment, containing vocal samples from the band's recording "Zilch". The contract bridge convention known as either Last Train or Last Train to Clarksville was so named by its inventor, Jeff Meckstroth, after the Monkees' song. [154]

  • Gave the Jimi Hendrix Experience their first U.S. concert tour exposure as an opening act in July 1967. [155]Jimi Hendrix's heavy psychedelic guitar and sexual overtones did not go over well with the teenage girls in the audience, which eventually led to his leaving the tour early. was inspired to introduce the character of Chekov in his Star Trek TV series in response to the popularity of Davy Jones, complete with hairstyle and appearance mimicking that of Jones. [156][157]
  • In 2014 the Monkees were inducted into America's Pop Music Hall of Fame. [158][159]
  • The Music Business Association (Music Biz) honored the Monkees with an Outstanding Achievement Award celebrating their 50th anniversary on May 16, 2016. [160]
  • The Monkees (1966)
  • More of The Monkees (1967)
  • Headquarters (1967)
  • Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. (1967)
  • The Birds, The Bees & the Monkees (1968)
  • Head (1968)
  • Instant Replay (1969)
  • The Monkees Present (1969)
  • Changes (1970)
  • Pool It! (1987)
  • Justus (1996)
  • Good Times! (2016)
  • Christmas Party (2018)
  • North American Tour (1966–67)
  • British Tour (1967)
  • Pacific Rim Tour (1968)
  • North American Tour (1969) (Dolenz, Jones, Nesmith)
  • 20th Anniversary World Tour (1986) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork)
  • Here We Come Again Tour (1987–88) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork), for most of the 1987 shows, "Weird Al" Yankovic was the opening act.
  • The Monkees Live (1989) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork)
  • The Monkees Summer Tour (1989) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork)
  • Monkees: The 30th Anniversary Tour (1996) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork)
  • Justus Tour (1997)
  • North American Tour (1997) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork)
  • U.S. Tour (2001) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork Tork removed from the tour partway through)
  • Monkeemania Returns Tour (2001–2002) (Dolenz, Jones) (2011) (Dolenz, Jones, Tork)
  • An Evening with The Monkees (Fall 2012) (Dolenz, Nesmith, Tork)[82]
  • A Midsummer's Night with the Monkees (Summer 2013) (Dolenz, Nesmith, Tork)
  • The Monkees Live in Concert (Spring 2014) (Dolenz, Nesmith, Tork)
  • An Evening with the Monkees (2015) (Dolenz, Tork)
  • 50th Anniversary Tour (2016) (Dolenz, Tork with selected appearances by Nesmith)
  • The Mike and Micky Show (2019) (Dolenz, Nesmith) (2019 dates billed as the Monkees)
  • An Evening with the Monkees (2020 postponed)
  • The Monkees Farewell Tour (Fall 2021)

Related non-Monkees tours Edit

  • The Great Golden Hits of The Monkees (1975–77) (Dolenz, Jones, Boyce and Hart)
  • Sound of The Monkees (1986 1987) (Jones, Tork)
  • Micky and Davy: Together Again (1994–95) (Dolenz, Jones)
  • The Monkees Present: The Mike and Micky Show (2018–19) (Dolenz, Nesmith) (early dates billed as a Dolenz and Nesmith duo and not the Monkees)

A comic book series, The Monkees, was published in the United States by Dell Comics, which ran for 17 issues from 1967 to 1969. [161]

In the United Kingdom, a Daily Mirror "Crazy Cartoon Book" featured four comic stories as well as four photos of the Monkees, all in black and white it was published in 1967.

In 2000, VH-1 produced the television biopic Daydream Believers: The Monkees' Story. [162] In 2002, the movie was released on DVD and featured both commentaries and interviews with Dolenz, Jones and Tork. The aired version did differ from the DVD release, as the TV version had an extended scene with all four Monkees meeting the Beatles, but with a shortened Cleveland concert segment. It was also available on VHS.

A stage musical opened in the UK at the Manchester Opera House on Friday March 30, 2012, and was dedicated to Davy Jones (the Jones family attended the official opening on April 3). [163] The production is a Jukebox musical and starred Stephen Kirwan, Ben Evans, Tom Parsons and Oliver Savile [163] as actors playing the parts of the Monkees (respectively Dolenz, Jones, Nesmith, Tork) who are hired by an unscrupulous businessman to go on a world tour pretending to be the real band. The show includes 18 Monkees songs plus numbers by other 60s artists. It ran in Manchester as part of the "Manchester Gets it First" program until April 14, 2012 before a UK tour. [163] [164] Following its Manchester run, the show appeared in the Glasgow King's Theatre and the Sunderland Empire Theatre. [163]


Micky Dolenz recalls ill-fated Monkees tour with opening act Jimi Hendrix: ‘Yeah, it was kind of embarrassing’

Fifty years ago, on Sept. 18, 1970, guitar legend Jimi Hendrix died of asphyxia while intoxicated. He was only 27 years old, and his stint as a superstar lasted less than five years, but he obviously made his indelible mark — being declared by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as “arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music” and by Rolling Stone as the greatest guitarist of all time.

And one of the first mainstream rock acts to recognize Hendrix’s greatness was the Monkees. Unfortunately, the Monkees’ young fans weren’t quite as enthusiastic when that TV band’s Micky Dolenz came up with the seemingly bizarre idea to hire Hendrix as the opening act for the Monkees’ first U.S. tour in 1967.

Hendrix ended up playing only seven of that tour’s 29 dates, dropping out after having to contend nightly with thousands of nasty, impatient, jeering teenyboppers. “Yeah, it was kind of embarrassing,” Dolenz admits to Yahoo Entertainment. “Jimi would go, ‘Purple haze!’ and the kids would be like, ‘We want Davy!’ He’d go, ‘Foxy lady!’ and they’d yell, ‘We. Want. The. Monkees! We. Want. The. Monkees!’ He was coming up against that very typical opening-act dilemma for anyone touring with a big headliner, really.”

The odd pairing might have been doomed from the start, given the two artists’ very different audiences. But Dolenz had been a fan of Hendrix since the guitar god was still known as “Jimmy James” and performing in Greenwich Village nightclubs with the Blue Flames. “It was 1966 or so, and the Monkees were in New York on a press junket,” he recalls of the first time he saw Hendrix live. “Someone said, ‘You gotta come down to the Village and check this cat out.’ The actual act was, I think, the John Hammond Band or something. But when we went down there, I remember sitting in the front row and there was this young kid, and he was playing guitar with his teeth! I didn't even know his name at the time. I don't even know if he was introduced, but he was going under the name Jimmy James at that point. He was just great.”

About a year later, Dolenz saw Hendrix again, at the Monterey Pop Festival. Much had changed, and this time, Dolenz was even more impressed: “Between that time, Jimi had gone to England and run into a guy named Chas Chandler, who was going to be his manager. And basically what Chas Chandler did, my understanding is, was he heard Jimi and then he put Jimi together with [bassist] Noel Redding and [drummer] Mitch Mitchell. And so ironically, I guess you can say that the Jimi Hendrix Experience was a ‘manufactured group’!”

When Dolenz witnessed Hendrix’s iconic performance at the Monterey Pop Festival, he recalls, “All of a sudden this act comes on, not very well known yet, but very flamboyant — the clothes, the music. And I said, ‘Hey, that's the guy that plays guitar with his teeth!’ I recognized him. And so simultaneously, just by coincidence really, we were looking for an opening act for our first tour. So, I suggested the Jimi Hendrix Experience to our producers, because obviously it was incredible music, but also very theatrical. And the Monkees were a theatrical act, if you really examine it. I guess that's why it made sense to me. I just thought it would make a great mix.”

Apparently the admiration wasn’t mutual at first, as Hendrix had previously blasted the Monkees in the U.K. press, describing their music to Melody Maker as “dishwater” and saying, “Oh God, I hate them!” But once the Monkees’ “people went to his people,” says Dolenz, “Chas Chandler and everyone thought it was a good idea.” And so, on July 8 — less than a month after Hendrix had been the breakout star of Monterey Pop — the Jimi Hendrix Experience joined the Monkees for their first joint tour date in Jacksonville, Fla.

While the audience was vicious and unwelcoming, Dolenz was too wrapped up in watching Hendrix’s electric stage show to actually notice what was transpiring in the venue. “I didn’t even pay attention to what the audience reaction was, because I was just mesmerized by Jimi and his art,” he confesses. “We were just blown away by him every night — I know Nez [the Monkees’ Mike Nesmith] especially was. We would just stand in the wings in awe. I was fascinated by Jimi’s showmanship, by his persona. All I knew was, I liked it. And to this day, I don't care much what people thought.”

Hendrix apparently did care what people thought, as he decided to quit the Monkees’ tour just eight days later, after dates in Miami, North Carolina, and a three-night run at New York City’s Forest Hills Tennis Stadium. Later, a seemingly bitter Hendrix told British music paper the NME that he’d been replaced by “Mickey Mouse.” Dolenz can neither deny nor confirm the longstanding rumor that Hendrix flipped the bird at the combative crowd during that final NYC show, though he quips, “I've never seen evidence of that rumor, but if it's true, he certainly ain’t the first person to flip off an audience.”

In retrospect, Dolenz says he “wasn't totally surprised” that the Monkees/Hendrix tour didn’t work out. “It was just night and day,” he admits of their clashing musical styles. “And we all knew, because he was fairly unknown at the time, that those thousands and thousands of kids were there to see the Monkees. Jimi knew that too.” As for whether he thinks the negative reaction Hendrix received had anything to do with racism, he insists, “No, it had to do with the fact that these fans had spent so much of their money to see the headliners. And if fans like that are really, really anxious and passionate, they'll make their feelings known.”

Despite Hendrix’s poor reception, reservations about joining the tour in the first place, and that NME shade, he and the Monkees did hit it off, getting up to all sorts of rock ‘n’ roll adventures during their week on the road. “We spent a lot of time together. We went to clubs and wandered around aimlessly, and sometimes non-aimlessly,” says Dolenz fondly. “We got along great and had a great time. We partied we hung around in the hotel rooms jamming and just singing, having little aftershow parties. I remember once we went to the Electric Circus in New York, a very famous psychedelic place back then.

“He was a lovely man, though very different from his persona onstage. He was very quiet — I don't want to say naive, but just a real nice, real quiet guy. But then, of course, he would launch into this incredible persona onstage, which was just phenomenal. We partied, and he partied just as good as anybody else, but it wasn't like he always had to be the life of the party and always have the attention. That's probably the reason why we got along, because I’m the same way: I get fulfillment onstage, and when I'm offstage, I want to be left alone.”

Though Dolenz and the rest of the Monkees were saddened when Hendrix suddenly quit, he admits, “Frankly, I didn't feel that bad. I'd like to think that the tour gave him some sort of a little shot, some more people knowing his name. I'm sure that some of those Monkees fans went on to be Hendrix fans.” So, in the end, the Monkees — who’d often caught flak for being a “manufactured group” — were vindicated for championing Hendrix so early on. (They were also early supporters of Frank Zappa, Tim Buckley, and Harry Nilsson, who all appeared on or wrote music for The Monkees sitcom.) But, Dolenz stresses, “We didn't run around tooting our horn to the NBC press department, saying, ‘Oh look, the Monkees like Jimi Hendrix! Aren't they cool?’ … And let me make it very clear, on the record: Jimi Hendrix would have done very well without us.”


Jimi Hendrix drops out as opening act for The Monkees - HISTORY

Posted on 09/18/2020 3:43:19 PM PDT by Rummyfan

Fifty years ago, on Sept. 18, 1970, guitar legend Jimi Hendrix died of asphyxia while intoxicated. He was only 27 years old, and his stint as a superstar lasted less than five years, but he obviously made his indelible mark — being declared by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as “arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music” and by Rolling Stone as the greatest guitarist of all time.

And one of the first mainstream rock acts to recognize Hendrix’s greatness was the Monkees. Unfortunately, the Monkees’ young fans weren’t quite as enthusiastic when that TV band’s Micky Dolenz came up with the seemingly bizarre idea to hire Hendrix as the opening act for the Monkees’ first U.S. tour in 1967.

Hendrix ended up playing only seven of that tour’s 29 dates, dropping out after having to contend nightly with thousands of nasty, impatient, jeering teenyboppers. “Yeah, it was kind of embarrassing,” Dolenz admits to Yahoo Entertainment. “Jimi would go, ‘Purple haze!’ and the kids would be like, ‘We want Davy!’ He’d go, ‘Foxy lady!’ and they’d yell, ‘We. Want. The. Monkees! We. Want. The. Monkees!’ He was coming up against that very typical opening-act dilemma for anyone touring with a big headliner, really.”

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What genius decided that Jimi opening for the Monkees was a good idea? LOL.

Jimi Hendrix the greatest guitarist? Santana might disagree.

The same genius made the decision 20 years later to have the new Prince open for george thoroughgood and The Rolling Stones.

Holy unnecessary apostrophe, Batman.

I enjoy ice cream and I enjoy scrambled eggs, but I wouldn’t throw them in a bowl and mush them together.

Micky Dolenz came up with the seemingly bizarre idea to hire Hendrix as the opening act for the Monkees

Kudos to Dolenz for his good taste in music, however. I wish I was old enough to have caught Hendrix live, whether opening for the Monkees or anywhere else.

Forgot about that. Clash of music there. Probably like The Partridge Family and Lynard Skynard double bill?

I think "Jimi Hendrix is the greatest guitarist" is just something you're supposed to say. Though he was very good, in my mind he clearly wasn't the greatest.

You spelled Stevie Ray Vaughan wrong.

Micky did. He saw Jimi at Monterey Pop and decided to try to help. It was good intentions. It could have worked. They have some overlap in audience. well me anyway. I would have dug it.

5 times, including Woodstock and Band of Gypsies.

Hey, Jimi Hendrix died the same way George Floyd did!

As book Monkee Business put it, Jimi was
not too crazy about playing teenybopper
crowds.
Jimi:”Foxy. ”
Fans:”Davy!”

When he departed the tour they lied
and said it was because Daughters of the American
Revolution were upset at his erotic on
stage antics

Pete Townsend of The Who absolutely did not want to follow Jimi at Monterey Pop, the concert that changed rock and roll.

The Monkees concert I went to had Weird Al Yankovic as their opening act, a much better music/humor combination.

Santana can disagree all he wants.

When I was eight years old, the Monkees were a huge part of my life. I watched their TV show every week. We had a cat who had kittens and we named them Peter, Mickey, Michael and Davy. I probably had a little Monkees metal lunchbox that I carried to school every day, and I listened to my 45s each night. But that was in 1966. By 1970, Were they even still around?

The next argument is which of his pieces were his best. While I like Purple Haze, his guitar playing in "Dolly Dagger Live at the Isle of Wight" is a must-hear. (the lyrics are not so good)

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Jimi Hendrix drops out as opening act for The Monkees - HISTORY

The Beatles vs. “The Monkees”… Well, that’s really no contest, is it? Isn’t that rather like comparing Marilyn Monroe to J. Lo? Jim Carrey to Pauly Shore?

As we all well know and readily concede- fame-wise, talent-wise, popularity-wise, music-wise, and immortality-wise, it’s no contest. But did you know The Monkees’ records outsold both the Beatles and the Rolling Stones combined in the years 1966 to 1967?

With that, let’s take a quick look at these two very popular “musical groups” of the 1960s, the parallels, the similarities, and the differences.

Beatles-Monkees- both cleverly punned, albeit misspelled, names of living non-human creatures. The Monkees were a synthetic “rock group” formed by four young men (two actors and two actual musicians) in 1966 to create a television show about four young carefree musicians, in direct homage to the Beatles’ first film “A Hard Day’s Night.”

The series made no attempt to hide or shy away from their all-too-obvious Beatles influence. In the very first episode of The Monkees TV show, we see Mike Nesmith throwing a dart at a Beatles poster (hitting Ringo). In another Monkees episode, we see the four boys lying on the ground, mumbling, all four heads pushed together, in a shot directly taken from “A Hard Day’s Night.” In yet another episode, Davy’s British grandfather comes to the states to pay him a visit (Paul’s grandfather was the main center of “A Hard Day’s Night”). Even in the very last Monkees episode, we see the boys waking up to their alarm clock / record player, which blares out “Good Morning, Good Morning,” the John Lennon song.

Almost every “Monkees” episode, in fact, featured a rollicking romp of the fours boys running around Helter-Skelter, in the exact same manner as the Beatles did in the famous “running in the field” scene from “A Hard Day’s Night.”

The exact character comparisons were fairly obvious too. John Lennon and Mike Nesmith were the “leaders” of their respective groups- the smartest ones, cracking sly jokes and asides, each with their droll sense of humor. Both somehow seemed “older” than the other three (Nesmith was, but Ringo Starr was actually the oldest Beatle).

Paul McCartney and Davy Jones were the “heart-throbs” of the teams- the two romantic leads, the best looking of the eight and the girls’ favorites. Paul’s trademark ballad song was “Yesterday,” (originally titled: Scrambled Eggs) while Davy warbled “I wanna be free.”

Ringo and Peter Tork each took on the “cute and dumb one” title, the “Harpo Marx” of their respective teams.

Micky Dolenz, definitely the most gifted singer of the Monkees, and George Harrison “The Quiet Beatle,” were a little harder to pigeonhole. Micky and Ringo were both drummers. And George and Peter were each group’s respective most dedicated musicians.

By a strange bit of irony, when the Beatles made their legendary first appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in Feb. Of 1964 before a record-breaking TV audience of 73 million viewers, a young Davy Jones appeared in the cast of “Oliver!” on the same broadcast.

Feeling his oats by 1967, Davy Jones was to state publicly that the Monkees had shown more growth and advancement from their first to third albums than the Beatles had from their first to fifth albums. But for their part, the Beatles showed no resentment over their imitators huge success in 1966-67. John Lennon said the Monkees were “the funniest comedy team since the Marx brothers,” adding that he “never missed an episode” of their TV show.

George Harrison, another Monkees admirer, said “When they get it all sorted out, they might turn out to be the best.”

When the Monkees came to England in 1967, the Beatles even threw them a big party at the “Speakeasy” club. Mike Nesmith had dinner at John Lennon’s home and the two, and their two respective wives, became friends. Mike also attended the Beatles recording sessions for the song “A Day in the Life.”

Paul McCartney became acquainted with Micky Dolenz and is seen at the “Sgt. Pepper’s” recording sessions grinning happily with a mustachioed McCartney. In 1967, the Monkees album “Headquarters” hit the #1 spot on the charts. Of course, its success lasted only one week, before being replaced by the Beatles and “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”

Want more? How about these connections:

  • On February 13, 1967, Paul and Ringo attended a Jimi Hendrix concert. In early June of 󈨇, Paul saw Hendrix again live, and was flattered to hear the genius guitarist strumming the strings to the opening notes of “Sgt. Pepper.” In less than a week, Hendrix was the opening act for the Monkees on their 1967 world tour. (In possibly the most ridiculous, eye-rolling, irony in the history of rock music, Jimi was booed off the stage at each of his appearances by angry, impatient Monkees fans, and left the tour in disgrace after a few days. Yep…)
  • The very first self-written song by Micky Dolenz was called “Randy Scouse Git” and mentions “Four Kings of EMI” (Gee, I wonder who he was referring to?)
  • In the Beatles album “Rubber Soul,” they have a song called “Girl,” while Davy Jones sings a completely different song called “Girl” in his guest appearance on “The Brady Bunch” in 1971.
  • Peter Tork was actually a guest guitar player on George Harrison’s first solo album “Wonderwall.”
  • In 1968, John Lennon was famous for bringing his girlfriend, Yoko Ono, into the sacred “no chicks allowed” Beatles recording sessions. But in 1967, Micky Dolenz often invited his sister, Coco, to sit in at the Monkees recording dates.
  • In 1977, Micky and Ringo appeared together in a Levi’s commercial. And when Micky Dolenz hosted a radio show for WCBS-FM in New York, he interviewed Ringo. Micky also made a brief guest appearance in Paul McCartney’s 1976 documentary film “Wings Across America.”
  • In 1995, Ringo appeared with Davy, Micky and Peter in a “Pizza Hut” commercial.
  • In 2002, Paul can be heard singing “Hey, Hey We’re the Monkees” in his 2002 concert film “Back in the Us.”

So the Beatles vs. The Monkess? Well, let’s look at it this way- yes, there is “Seinfeld” and there is “Gilligan’s Island.” The Beatles were, obviously, four immensely talented singers and musicians, with their cornerstone being the greatest songwriting team of the past half-century (Lennon-McCartney). In their famous press conferences and their all-too-brief film career, the Beatles also proved themselves to be very gifted, funny comedians.

The Monkees were very gifted comedic actors. They were renowned for not even playing their own instruments, but they did compose a handful of very good songs between them.

Jim Backus, perhaps, said it best when he was once asked about the low-grade, childish humor of his show “Gilligan’s Island.” The questioner made the point that Gilligan’s Island “wasn’t Shakespeare.” Backus, not insulted, agreed with the interviewer’s premise and readily acknowledged that his popular series, indeed, was not Shakespeare. “I know, but there’s room for us all. There’s room for everybody.”

If you liked this article, you might also enjoy our new popular podcast, The BrainFood Show (iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, Feed), as well as:


Jimi Hendrix, The Doors (Hidden Opening Acts) 1967 Forest Hills Concert Poster.

Jimi Hendrix, The Doors (Hidden Opening Acts) 1967 Forest Hills Concert Poster. An original cardboard window card advertising eight top-selling attractions appearing at New York's Forest Hills Music Festival in June, July and August of 1967. The biggest surprises amongst these acts, however, are well-hidden from the eye on this very rare poster. Fans of the Jimi Hendrix Experience and The Doors will know just what we're talking about.

It's very well-documented and much-discussed that Hendrix opened some shows for the Monkees in '67 just before he broke out to stardom. And this weekend at Forest Hills was the final time they played together Hendrix's heavy sound was just too much for the Monkees' teenybopper fans. It's astonishing to think that this was actually one month after Jimi's spellbinding performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. But the movie of that festival hadn't been released yet, and the world wasn't connected the way it is today.

Jimi had been opening for the Monkees for only a week before this Forest Hills weekend, playing the previous weekend in Florida and a couple of mid-week shows in North Carolina. Then these three nights at Forest Hills, and the experiment was over. Hendrix conducted a phone interview with England's New Musical Express right afterwards, and described his previous week thusly:

"Firstly they gave us the 'death' spot on the show, right before the Monkees were due on, so the audience just screamed and yelled for the Monkees! Finally they agreed to let us go on first, and things were much better. We got screams and good reactions, and some kids even rushed the stage. But we were not getting any billing. all the posters just screamed out MONKEES. Then some parents who brought their young kids complained that our act was vulgar. We decided that it was just the wrong audience. I think they're replacing me with Mickey Mouse."

Interestingly, Jimi's debut album Are You Experienced? had been out in the U.K. for two months at this point, but Reprise wouldn't release it in America until late August. As for the single "Purple Haze," it had been released in June, but wouldn't enter the Billboard Hot 100 until August, where even then it barely made a whimper.

And in another "Whaaaat?" moment in rock history, Jim Morrison and the Doors were booked to open for soft folkies Simon & Garfunkel, who had actually met in school in the 50's right there in Forest Hills. So the audience was theirs, and wanted nothing to do with this dark, foreboding presence from the west coast. It was a musical mismatch to the max, and some heads are still shaking to this day.

It was a snake-bitten if historic night for the L.A. band. First, their equipment didn't arrive on time, so they had to hustle to borrow instruments to play. The group steps onstage, Morrison growls "This is the end!" and a hush falls over the crowd, but not an awestruck one more like a perplexed one. They remain silent as the Doors work through four songs in their abbreviated set: "Break on Through," "Back Door Man," "Light My Fire" and "The End."

"The band plays exceptionally well, especially considering the circumstances," states Greg Shaw in his book The Doors on the Road (Omnibus Press). "They conclude with a striking version of 'The End,' and then abruptly leave the stage after about half an hour." But the crowd was so distant, callous and close-minded that Paul Simon actually reprimanded them from the stage, explaining how difficult it can be for any new group trying to break in.

New group? Trying to break in? Guess what: In Billboard magazine's Hot 100 for the week ending on August 12 - the date of this show - the #1 record in the country was. "Light My Fire." How lame and elitist could a supposedly hip audience possibly be?

As for this beautiful board itself, we counted no fewer than TEN different colors used, which must be some kind of record for a telephone-pole poster (as opposed to psychedelic). This extra-thick poster is difficult if not impossible to find, and certainly the first time Heritage has ever sold one. It measures 13 3/8" x 22" and grades to Very Good Plus condition. COA from Heritage Auctions.

Condition details: A good, solid, rigid board, with most of its light damage being visible only when you tilt it at an angle to the light. There appears to have once been a hole punched, perhaps a nail hole, over the "TA" in "Stadium" in the top green box. It's perfectly fixed and shows evidence on the verso. The window card also once had four pin pricks in its corners, which have been easily removed (filled). There's a surface scuff from the "h" in "Johnny" up to the "n" in "Lovin'." Probably the main repaired surface damage from "Doc Severinson" down to the yellow phone number. Remember, this is all mostly visible only when you're scrutinizing the board at an angle. There's also just a very light, subtle bit of surface wear resulting in white at various places around the poster, like in the Joan Baez, Simon & Garfunkel and Steve & Eydie boxes. The verso basically has just scuffing from storage and that one repair near the top we mentioned earlier.


Στις 17 Ιουλίου 1967, ένα από τα πιο παράξενα μουσικά ζευγάρια στην ιστορία έρχεται στο τέλος, όταν ο Jimi Hendrix έπεσε έξω ως ανοιχτή πράξη για τις αισθήσεις teenybopper The Monkees.

Η κράτηση του ψυχεδελικού θεού βράχου Jimi Hendrix με το φτιαγμένο για την τηλεόραση Monkees ήταν το πνευματικό τέκνο του διευθυντή του Hendrix, Mike Jeffery, που επιζητούσε μεγαλύτερη έκθεση του κοινού για έναν νεαρό πελάτη που ήταν ένα νεοφιλελεύθερο αστέρι στο Ηνωμένο Βασίλειο, αλλά μια σχεδόν άγνωστη στις πατρίδες του Ηνωμένες Πολιτείες. Ήταν στο Ηνωμένο Βασίλειο, στην πραγματικότητα, ότι ο Monkee Mike Nesmith ακούει για πρώτη φορά μια ταινία του Hendrix παίζοντας ενώ σε ένα δείπνο με τους John Lennon, Paul McCartney και Eric Clapton. Ο Nesmith και οι συνάδελφοί του Monkees Peter Tork και Micky Dolenz έγιναν οπαδοί του Jimi Hendrix και αφού είδαν τη θρυλική παράσταση του στο Φεστιβάλ Monterey Pop τον Ιούνιο του 1967, ενθάρρυναν τους δικούς τους διευθυντές να προσκαλέσουν τη γνωστή αλλά πολύ σεβαστή Jimi Hendrix Experience την επερχόμενη περιοδεία τους στις ΗΠΑ.

Ο ίδιος ο Hendrix φαίνεται ότι δεν είχε άμεση συμβολή στην απόφαση, παρόλο που είχε διατυπώσει τη γνώμη του για τους Monkees αρκετούς μήνες νωρίτερα σε μια συνέντευξη Melody Maker περιοδικό: "Ω Θεέ, τους μισώ! Πλυντήριο πιάτων . Δεν μπορείτε να χτυπήσετε κανέναν για την παραγωγή του, αλλά οι άνθρωποι σαν τους Monkees "Παρ 'όλα αυτά, Hendrix εντάχθηκε στην περιοδεία που βρίσκεται σε εξέλιξη στο Τζάκσονβιλ, Φλόριντα, στις 8 Ιουλίου. Προβλεπόμενος, η υποδοχή που δόθηκε στην τώρα-θρυλική ροκ οι νεαροί οπαδοί του φουσκάλου Monkees ήταν λιγότερο από λατρευτικός. Όπως θυμήθηκε αργότερα ο Mickey Dolenz, «ο Jimi θα βρεθεί στη σκηνή, θα πυροβολήσει τους ενισχυτές και θα ξεσπάσει στο 'Purple Haze», και τα παιδιά στο ακροατήριο θα τον πνίξουν αμέσως με «Θέλουμε Daaavy!» Θεός, ήταν στενόχωρος."

Ο Jimi Hendrix κατόρθωσε να πετύχει συνολικά μόνο επτά ημερομηνίες με τους Monkees, με αποκορύφωμα την τελική του εμφάνιση στις 17 Ιουλίου 1967, η οποία μπορεί ή όχι να τελείωσε με τον Hendrix να χαιρετά το πλήθος με το μεσαίο δάχτυλό του. Δεν υπήρχε καμία αλήθεια στην ευρέως κυκλοφορούμενη φήμη ότι είχε ξεκινήσει από την περιοδεία μετά από διαμαρτυρίες από τις κόρες της αμερικανικής επανάστασης ότι η παράστασή του ήταν "πολύ ερωτική".


Watch the video: #Shorts Cover Vodoo Child Jimi Hendrix